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Title:

MOVING ON? DISPERSAL POLICY, ONWARD MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION OF REFUGEES IN THE UK

Summary:

Since 2000, the UK has operated compulsory dispersal, a policy designed to ‘spread the burden’ of housing asylum seekers who require accommodation across the UK and to discourage long-term settlement in London and the South East. To enhance understanding of refugee integration, this research discusses the two-year (2012–14), ESRC-funded project, in which the geography of onward migration amongst refugees dispersed across the UK as asylum seekers was mapped. The findings are based on 83 in-depth interviews with refugees, analysis of Refugee Integration and Employment Service (RIES) client data (2008–11) and analysis of the Home Office Survey of New Refugees (SNR) data (2005–09) for four different sites across the UK: Glasgow, Cardiff, Manchester and London. The report explores the main factors that influence refugees’ decisions to stay in a town or city or move on and considered how this affects the process of integration. Finally, the report examines the policy implications for the different levels of government, service providers and the voluntary sector of the long-term impact of UK dispersal policy on refugee onward migration and integration. The report weaves together quantitative and qualitative data analysis findings to address key questions surrounding refugee onward migration and integration outcomes.

Bibliographic reference:

Stewart, E. and Shaffer, M. (2015) Moving on? Dispersal Policy, Onward Migration and Integration of Refugees in the UK, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

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UK

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