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McCollum et al. (2014) Public attitudes towards migration in Scotland: Exceptionality and possible policy implications

Summary:

McCollum et al. (2014) challenge the common perception that Scots are more welcoming to migrants than their UK counterparts: a view often upheld by Scottish politicians against the political backdrop of the Scottish and UK Governments’ divergence on immigration policy. Although the authors do find evidence of favourable attitudes towards migration among the Scottish public (these attitudes are perhaps explained by historic immigration and emigration to and from Scotland) they also highlight emerging attitudes of opposition to migration. As the authors point out, such findings clearly have implications for policy debates on future immigration and constitutional change in Scotland. For further studies on attitudes to discrimination in Scotland see Bromley et al. (2007) and Lewis (2006) who examines Scottish attitudes towards asylum seekers and refugees. Also see Scottish Government (2013b) which provides a review of equality and ethnicity issues and includes discussion of attitudes to racial discrimination. Tindal et al. (2014b) discuss immigration policy and constitutional change from the perspective of Scottish employers and industry.

Bibliographic reference:

McCollum, D. Nowok, B. and Tindal, S. (2014) Public Attitudes Towards Migration in Scotland: Exceptionality and Possible Policy Implications, Scottish Affairs, Vol.23(1), pp.79-102.

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Free

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