Keywords:

Title:

Levecque and Van Rossem (2014) Depression in Europe: Does migrant integration have mental health payoffs? A cross-national comparison of 20 European countries

Summary:

In this comparative study of twenty European countries Levecque and Van Rossem (2014) look at how migrant mental health may potentially be affected by integration policies, and therefore of relevance to any host country. The UK is included in the study, though Scotland is not discussed separately. The study focuses on depression, analysing data at both national and individual levels and takes recognised barriers to integration (i.e. economic, employment, education, status, discrimination and state integration policies) into account. The study finds that first generation migrants (both EU and non-EU migrants) experience depression at proportionately higher rates than native populations. A higher incidence is however experienced by those born outside Europe. This pattern also appears following analysis of data for second-generation migrants. The authors find that barriers to socio-economic integration and discriminatory processes are more significant for these findings than a migrant’s specific ethnic minority background.

Bibliographic reference:

Levecque, K. and Van Rossem, R. (2014) Depression in Europe: does migrant integration have mental health payoffs? A cross-national comparison of 20 European countries, Ethnicity and Health, pp.1-17. doi: 10.1080/13557858.2014.883369.

Cost:

£

Link:

Status:

Aspect:

Location:

UK

Resource type: