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Title:

Knifton (2012) Understanding and addressing the stigma of mental illness with ethnic minority communities

Summary:

This study by Knifton (2012) explores the beliefs, stigma and the effectiveness of national mental health campaigns for Scotland’s Pakistani, Indian and Chinese communities. The starting point for the author is the premise that existing anti-stigma campaigns have failed to engage with ethnic communities as a result of failure to use appropriate language, imagery and media and by adopting a western medical concept of illness. Resultantly, the author contends that stigma associated with mental health can only be addressed through understanding the relevant socio-cultural context. Overall, this study by Knifton (2012) highlights the pervasiveness of mental illness among already disadvantaged ethnic communities, and the detrimental impact of stigma which undermines an individuals’ ability to seek help, recover from mental illness and their life chances. See also Levecque and Van Rossem (2014) which looks at how migrant mental health may potentially be affected by integration policies and Quinn et al (2011) which covers mental health stigma with asylum seekers and refugees in Glasgow.

Bibliographic reference:

Knifton, L. (2012) Understanding and addressing the stigma of mental illness with ethnic minority communities. Health Sociology Review, Vol.21(3), pp.287-298.

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Free

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