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Title:

Hickman, Crowley, Mai (2008), Immigration and social cohesion in the UK The rhythms and realities of everyday life

Summary:

This research set out to improve our understanding of the relationship between new immigration and social cohesion by exploring the rhythms and realities of everyday life of both the long-term settled and new arrival residents. The research is based on the premise that everyday realities in the UK are under pressure from the forces of individualisation, globalisation and post-industrialism, which structure the lives of the long-term settled and new immigrants alike. We aimed to investigate the strategies people deployed, in a time of far-reaching changes, to meet their perceived priorities and needs. In current public debates, there is an association made between increasing ethnic and religious diversity and the erosion of social cohesion. However, recent research has shown that age, class and where we live are far more important in shaping life chances than are ethnicity or religion and that the arrival of new migrant groups did not coincide with an increase in crime. We explored the relations between and within long-term resident and new arrival groups and the impact of social and economic transformations in six sites across the UK: • England:Leicester; • England: London, Downham; • England: London, Kilburn; • England: Peterborough and Thetford; • Northern Ireland: Dungannon; • Scotland:Glasgow.

Bibliographic reference:

Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2008

Cost:

Free

Link:

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Aspect:

Location:

UK

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