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Title:

Deuchar (2011) People look at us the way we dress and they think we’re gangsters - bonds, bridges, gangs and refugees - A qualitative study of inter-cultural social capital in Glasgow

Summary:

Deuchar (2011) draws attention to the interplay between Glasgow’s youth (gang) culture and marginalisation of young refugees. The study explores the concept of inter-cultural social capital, based on assertions that those communities who exhibit higher levels of inter-cultural social capital offer optimum conditions for refugee integration. Communities in which higher levels of social bonding and disconnection are displayed are less successful when it comes to conditions for refugee integration as these factors can inhibit inter-cultural integration. It is argued that gang solidarity can even promote intolerance. Deuchar (2011) identifies gang membership, albeit territorial in nature, as providing a platform for ethnic solidarity and consequently racial prejudice. Although a small-scale study, its strength lies in laying a foundation for the exploration of this fascinating area. The authors call for policy that reflects the need to develop social capital within multi-ethnic urban communities, and consider the potential for community initiatives to build inter-cultural cohesion.

Bibliographic reference:

Deuchar, R. (2011) ‘People look at us, the way we dress, and they think we’re gangsters’: bonds, bridges, gangs and refugees: a qualitative study of inter-cultural social capital in Glasgow. Journal of Refugee Studies, Vol.24(4), pp.672-689.

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