Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
de Lima et al. (2007) A study of migrant workers in Grampian This study of migrant workers in Grampian by de Lima et al. (2007) finds that migrants are an integral part of the locally employed workforce within the hospitality, agricultural and food processing sectors. Migrants are seen as the primary solution to labour shortages within the region. The study looks at the impact migrant workers have on local services. It also examines migrant access to these services. In doing so, the study identifies areas for consideration by service providers. The presence of a language barrier is a key point that emerges from the research. The language barrier is problematic for both service providers and migrant workers alike. In addition, a noticeable pattern of over qualified migrants subjected to irregular and long working hours is also in evidence. See also de Lima (2010); and Danson and Jentsch (2009) for further study of migrant labour in rural Scotland and, de Lima and Wright (2009) who also explore the roles and the impact of migrant workers within rural communities. Read More Visit site Free Aberdeenshire, Moray, Aberdeen City Scottish Government document
Highlands and Islands Enterprise (2009) Young people in the Highlands and Islands: Understanding and influencing the migration choices of young people to and from the Highlands and Islands of Scotland This study commissioned by Highlands and Islands Enterprise, sets out to understand the major factors influencing the choices people make when planning and undertaking relocation within Scotland. The study asks what measures can be taken to influence the choices that young people who are considering migrating (either to, from or within the Highlands and Islands region of Scotland) make. The study was undertaken because, proportionately, the Highlands & Islands has far lower numbers of 15 to 30 year olds in the population than is typical for the Scottish population overall. Consequently, the region is faced with the prospect of an ageing population and a decreasing work-age population. While this research does not focus specifically on foreign migrant workers, nonetheless this group is recognised as important in the context of the region’s economic and demographic development. Thus, foreign migrant workers are given due consideration in the analysis, which identifies education, employment and the environment as key policy areas which require further development. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Moray, Orkney Islands Scottish Government document
Jentsch et al. (2007) Migrant workers in rural Scotland: ‘going to the middle of nowhere’ This paper explores international migration to rural Scotland. The study finds that rural development is crucial for the creation of an environment that is both welcoming and meets the aspirations of migrant workers. Although improvement has been made in attempts to facilitate integration, it is the networks that develop between migrants that are perhaps the most significant factor for their integration. These links allow migrants to benefit from the experience of earlier arrivals. Recruitment agencies can also play a similar – integrative -role. With the experiences of both migrants and employers represented, Jentsch et al. (2007) highlight the lack of high-level employment opportunities as an obstacle to long-term settlement. As has already been seen among the youth in rural communities, migrants too may leave in search of better opportunities. The authors also find debate on migration in Scotland to be less focused on ethnicity, and caution that, should more non-accession state migrants arrive, without an accompanying positive discourse the debate may develop into one that reflects the levels of negativity which surround the issue of migration in the rest of the UK. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Moray, Orkney Islands Journal article
McKenna (2006) Equality in Moray: Research into equalities policy and practice This study explores issues of policy and practice related to gender, disability and race equalities within Moray. It provides a considerable amount of detail on access to employment and the service needs of Moray’s established minority ethnic communities and new migrants. The study analyses findings within the context of regional racial equality policy objectives. The analysis examines reported incidents of racism, consultations with minority ethnic communities, interviews with migrant workers and a public survey conducted via the Moray Citizens Panel. The report underlines the increasing diversity of Moray’s population, identifying new migrant communities such as Polish, Portuguese and the particular Russian language translation needs of Latvian Russian speakers. Part of the research process involved reaching out to the local Chinese community, which as Moray’s largest established minority, had not previously been involved in any community planning process. Read More Visit site Free Moray Public sector