Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Guma, Taulant (2015) The ethnicisation of need: questioning the role of ethnicity in the provision of support and services for post-accession migrants in Glasgow This policy paper focuses on the role that ethnicity played in the provision of support and services for post-accession migrants living in Glasgow, based on intensive ethnographic fieldwork conducted throughout 2012 with Czech- and Slovak-speaking migrants living in the city. It is based on the PhD research project ‘Everyday negotiations of in/securities and risks: an ethnographic study amongst Czech- and Slovak-speaking migrants in Glasgow’ which was co-funded by the ESRC and Glasgow City Council. The paper argues that using ethnicity as a straightforward, ‘naturally existing’ category and making it a requirement for individuals’ access to certain services has problematic implications for affected migrants as well as service providers and policy-makers. Read More Visit site Free EU, A8 Glasgow Academic research
Kearns and Whitley (2015) Getting There? The Effects of Functional Factors, Time and Place on the Social Integration of Migrants A survey of 1400 migrants, including many asylum seekers and refugees, living in deprived areas in Glasgow, UK is used to test hypotheses in the literature about the effects of functional factors (educational qualifications, ability to speak English, employment), time and place upon the social integration of migrants. Three aspects are considered: trust, reliance and safety; social relations; sense of community. Overall, social integration indicators were worse for migrants than for British citizens living in the same places. Functional factors were positively associated with different aspects of social integration: higher education with more neighbourly behaviours; employment with better social relations and belonging; and English language with greater reliance on others and available social support. Time was positively associated with most social integration indicators; time in the local area more so than time in the UK. Living in a regeneration area was negatively associated with many aspects of social integration. The findings raise questions about the doubly negative effects of the use of dispersal policy for asylum seekers to regeneration areas, necessitating secondary relocation of migrants through further, forced onward migration. Read More Visit site £ UK, Glasgow, Scotland Article
Marsden, Ruth & Harris, Catherine (2015) “We started life again”: integration experiences of refugee families reuniting in Glasgow The research explores the experiences of families supported by the TCN Family Integration Service run by the British Red Cross in partnership with Scottish Refugee Council and Workers’ Educational Association. This programme piloted support for people arriving through refugee family reunion and ran from April 2014 until June 2015. The report highlights that the period immediately after family reunion can be a crisis point for refugees and their families when they are at higher risk of destitution and of homelessness or severe overcrowding. This occurs at a critical time of rebuilding family relations after months and often years of separation. It identifies gaps in integration pathways for young people and explores the risk of dependencies within families, particularly impacting women. Read More Visit site Free Refugee, TCN Glasgow Research Report