Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Candappa et al. (2007) Education and schooling for asylum-seeking and refugee students in Scotland: an exploratory study Candappa et al’s (2007) is a Scottish Executive Schools Directorate commissioned study which investigates the provision of education for refugee and asylum seeking pupils in Scotland. Exploring a range of related issues, the study’s principle aim was to identify best practice for integrating these pupils into the Scottish education system, based on the authors’ examination of existing provision. The study also takes account of policy and practice within two local authorities in England. The Scottish based research with chosen primary and secondary schools, was conducted in two Scottish cities (which remain anonymous in the report) and included interviews with senior staff, children and parents, in addition to a survey conducted with Scottish Education Authorities. Overall, this study highlights the numerous factors which affect refugee and asylum seeking children’s well-being, and ultimately underlines that all children in Scotland have entitlement to a full education. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland, England Scottish Government document
Cowen et al. (2011) Sanctuary, safety and solidarity: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender asylum seekers and refugees in Scotland Cowen et al. (2011) deliver a substantial report which finds the asylum and refugee system for LGBT asylum seekers and refugees to be profoundly flawed. The report comprises a review of literature, interviews with organisations in Scotland and London and, community consultation. A notable feature emerging from the report was a distinct lack of data regarding both the numbers involved in and, the issues faced by LGBT asylum seekers and refugees. The report identifies key areas for further investigation, particularly in terms of identifying and promoting existing expertise and expanding knowledge and understanding within existing organisations. The report clearly documents the significant barriers faced by LGBT asylum seekers and refugees who arrive looking for sanctuary in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland, England Third sector
Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) ‘We're still human beings, we're not aliens’: promoting the citizenship rights and cultural diversity of Traveller children in schools: Scottish and English perspectives Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) draw attention to the difficulties faced by Traveller children (including experiences of prejudice and incidences of racism), crucially the authors then explore how their marginalisation can be addressed through full inclusion within the school environment. Scottish and English case studies are used within their analysis. This is achieved by analysing Traveller children’s own accounts of the experience of attending school and includes children’s perceptions of their teachers’ views of them. The authors find that Traveller children are far from considered equal in terms of citizenship within the school environment and in effect retain ‘outsider’ status. See also Shubin (2011) which examines how Scottish Travellers itinerant lifestyle impacts on their access to - and participation in- Scottish society, Bromley et al. (2007) which reports on Scottish attitudes to discrimination, finds a prevalence of prejudice towards Traveller/Gypsy communities and, de Lima et al. (2011) which includes consideration of Traveller ethnicity within a study of ethnicity and poverty. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, England Journal article
Flint (2007) Faith schools, multiculturalism and community cohesion: Muslim and Roman Catholic state schools in England and Scotland Flint (2007) within a comparative examination of the development of Scotland’s Roman Catholic state schools and the emergence of England’s more recent Muslim state school sector, demonstrates that discourse associated with such faith schools replicates the tension found within conceptions of national identity, cohesion and citizenship. The author asserts that management of broader forms of diversity and the appreciation of existing inequality between religious and ethnic groups in asserting their rights and legitimacy is necessary first to foster community cohesion through education policy. The study underlines the right of minority ethnic groups to a faith-based education as part of their citizenship, which is supported by supranational legislation and highlights issues such as the tension between staff recruitment policy and such legislation. Overall, Flint (2007) provides a valuable contribution to the contemporary debate surrounding not only state provision of faith schools, but also the debate over community cohesion and citizenship. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, England Journal article
Hudson et al. (2013) In-work poverty, ethnicity and workplace cultures This report by Hudson et al. (2013) supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, examines the link between ethnicity and poverty experienced by low paid workers. In doing so, the report draws attention to the barriers low paid workers face in trying to progress and develop their career. The study includes a discussion of the role played by workplace cultures in the process of finding a way out of in-work poverty. The research is based on information gathered from interviews and workshops conducted in England and Scotland in both semi-rural and urban areas (which remain anonymous in the study). The report highlights informal workplace practices which disproportionately affect ethnic minorities, serve to perpetuate in-work poverty and undermine formal equal opportunity policies. The report includes an impressive list of recommendations aimed at employers and other key stakeholders (such as national and local Government, trade unions, equalities and community organisations) and seen as pivotal for any attempts to address the imbalance. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, England Third sector
Schleef et al. (2011) Teenagers acquisition of variation: A comparison of locally-born and migrant teens realisation of English (ing) in Edinburgh and London Schleef et al. (2011) give a fascinating insight into Polish migrant teenagers’ acquisition of English. The authors examine how the teenagers acquire local English speech variations. With case study sites in London and Edinburgh, the study finds that Polish adolescents absorb and replicate the variations of English they hear from their local-born peers. This phenomenon occurs in both cities. Interestingly, in some cases, the Polish teenagers also introduce new variations into the speech of their locally-born peers. The study reflects a consequence of the significant numbers of Polish migrants to the UK. The research also raises questions that are applicable to other non-English speaking migrant groups and, for studies concerned with how migrants learn and interact using the English language at a local level. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh, England Journal article
Trevena et al. (2013) Location, location? A critical examination of patterns and determinants of internal mobility among post-accession Polish migrants in the UK With specific focus on post-accession Polish migrants, Trevena et al. (2013) analyse data gathered from Poles living in England and Scotland across both rural and urban locations. The study aims to better understand their patterns of internal mobility following arrival to the UK. The authors find that family is a significant factor in decisions to move on. Those without children (or unaccompanied by children) were found to be more mobile. This was particularly so if they arrived in the UK through a recruitment agency. In contrast, those with school age children and those who had arrived by way of personal networks were least likely to move on. In addition, the study revealed that young migrants without children were more likely to make a rural to urban move, on the other hand, urban to rural moves were most likely to be made by those with families. Internal mobility appears to lessen once stable accommodation and permanent employment is found. Read More Visit site £ EU Scotland, England Journal article