Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Aberdeen City Council (2013) Migrant workers in Aberdeen City and Shire This document produced by Aberdeen City Council is designed to provide up to date information primarily for local council services and Community Planning partners to assist with policy development and service delivery. The document includes indicatory data on inward migration flows of migrant workers to the area, and incorporates data such as country of origin and comparative data on registrations compared with elsewhere in Scotland. In addition, the document also includes the locations of migrant workers within Aberdeen, and draws upon information gathered from National Insurance Number allocations to overseas nationals via the Department of Work and Pensions and the annual Pupils in Scotland Census – which details pupils whose main home language is not English. The analysis shows Aberdeen to be the third highest area for numbers of registered migrant workers behind only Edinburgh and Glasgow, with Aberdeenshire found to be the sixth highest. Read More Visit site Free Aberdeenshire, Aberdeen City Public sector
de Lima et al. (2007) A study of migrant workers in Grampian This study of migrant workers in Grampian by de Lima et al. (2007) finds that migrants are an integral part of the locally employed workforce within the hospitality, agricultural and food processing sectors. Migrants are seen as the primary solution to labour shortages within the region. The study looks at the impact migrant workers have on local services. It also examines migrant access to these services. In doing so, the study identifies areas for consideration by service providers. The presence of a language barrier is a key point that emerges from the research. The language barrier is problematic for both service providers and migrant workers alike. In addition, a noticeable pattern of over qualified migrants subjected to irregular and long working hours is also in evidence. See also de Lima (2010); and Danson and Jentsch (2009) for further study of migrant labour in rural Scotland and, de Lima and Wright (2009) who also explore the roles and the impact of migrant workers within rural communities. Read More Visit site Free Aberdeenshire, Moray, Aberdeen City Scottish Government document
Moskal (2014) Polish migrant youth in Scottish schools: Conflicted identity and family capital Moskal (2014) presents research based on a study which draws upon observation of Polish migrant children in their home and school environments. Detailed interviews allowed the children and young people’s perspectives to be brought to the fore. The study also included input from the parents of the seventeen young participants. The overall focus of the study was on experiences of school transition for first generation migrants. This was framed within a context of transferability of educational success and social mobility. Drawing upon sociological theory, Moskal (2014) covers a range of concepts including the family, social and cultural capital. The author then discusses the potential use of policy and practice to support young migrants. See also a briefing paper by Moskal (2010) exploring the integration of Polish migrant children to Scotland through an examination of the role of schools in the integration process. Moskal et al. (2010) reflects on educational initiatives and policy and the need to consider migration processes. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh, North Lanarkshire, Aberdeen City Journal article