Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Bowes and Domokos (1993) South Asian women and health services: A study in Glasgow Bowes and Domokos (1993) examined the healthcare experience of a selection of Glasgow’s South Asian women (mostly of Punjabi origin). They investigate the women’s own experiences through interviews. The authors also discuss the experiences of the women’s families. A number of issues emerged, such as a necessity for greater translation assistance and a need to challenge discrimination and stereotyping within health service delivery; the study stresses the importance of accessing the unheard voices of this minority group by focusing centrally on their concerns over healthcare. Although the study focused on a specific ethnic minority group and dates from the 1990s, it suggests additional areas for further research and its key finding is significant: rather than cultural barriers it is the healthcare system and occurrence of racism which inhibit full access to healthcare services for South Asian women in Glasgow. Read More Visit site £ TCN Glasgow City Journal article
Bowes et al. (1990a) The changing nature of Glasgow's ethnic‐minority community Bowes et al (1990a) chart the changes exhibited by ethnic minority groups in Glasgow (mainly within the context of council housing). The discussion is based on data gathered as part of an earlier local authority funded study. The paper incorporated data from the electoral register, which although limited in some respects, was nonetheless the best data available on household composition. The data are complemented by a household survey undertaken by the authors. The analysis shows the average ethnic minority household size as notably greater than the overall Glasgow average. In addition, the paper discusses ethnic minority employment patterns, the first and second languages spoken within households, and mobility. Although the study pre-dates the diversity seen today in Glasgow, it nonetheless provides an interesting snapshot of a period of change amongst Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article
Bowes et al. (1990b) Racism and harassment of Asians in Glasgow Although a study of racism during the late nineteen eighties, Bowes et al (1990b) combine case-study methodology and survey data to provide analysis of both institutional and interpersonal racism as experienced by the Asian community in Glasgow and considers those experiences within a wider Scottish context. With a focus on the policies of the Housing Department of the then Glasgow District Council, the paper begins with a interesting discussion of the use of central terms, which allows the authors to present an explanation for their use of the term ‘racial harassment’ in preference to that of ‘racist harassment’. Overall, the study found a general lack of enforcement rendered anti-racist measures ineffective when it came to addressing institutional racism. See also Bowes et al (1990a) for a study dating from the same period which also considered issues faced by Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities in relation to council housing. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article
Bynner (2010) Review of Community Engagement in Neighbourhood Management in Govanhill This report is the outcome of a review of local engagement within the Govanhill area of Glasgow, an area of the city which has a number of ethnic and migrant communities. Set up with guidance from the South East Community Health and Care Partnership, the Govanhill Neighbourhood Management (NM) Steering Group was conceived to coordinate public agencies, further education and other providers in their efforts to identify key local priorities and develop appropriate action plans for the area. Bynner’s report (2010) reviews Govanhill Neighbourhood Management (NM) Steering Group’s engagement with the voluntary sector and other local groups in order to find ways of improving communication between Govanhill’s various communities, allowing them to voice their point of view and gain increased influence within the community. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Third sector
Crawford et al. (2012) Migration and health in Glasgow and its relevance to GoWell This report by Crawford et al. (2012) was produced for the collaborative partnership GoWell (See www.gowellonline.com). With a focus on health and Wellbeing;in Glasgow, the study provides a brief historical background, an examination of the impact of migration through areas such as policy, regeneration, legislation and analysis of migration patterns. It also provides interesting detail of ethnic composition and demographic changes within the boundaries of the GoWell study area. The report reviews findings from survey data which report that migrants declare themselves to be in better health than fellow residents within their local community area. The report helps contextualise the GoWell study findings and provides an insightful account of the impact of previous and current migration patterns, the influence of policy, and the effects of migration on health in Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Public sector
Deuchar (2011) People look at us the way we dress and they think we’re gangsters - bonds, bridges, gangs and refugees - A qualitative study of inter-cultural social capital in Glasgow Deuchar (2011) draws attention to the interplay between Glasgow’s youth (gang) culture and marginalisation of young refugees. The study explores the concept of inter-cultural social capital, based on assertions that those communities who exhibit higher levels of inter-cultural social capital offer optimum conditions for refugee integration. Communities in which higher levels of social bonding and disconnection are displayed are less successful when it comes to conditions for refugee integration as these factors can inhibit inter-cultural integration. It is argued that gang solidarity can even promote intolerance. Deuchar (2011) identifies gang membership, albeit territorial in nature, as providing a platform for ethnic solidarity and consequently racial prejudice. Although a small-scale study, its strength lies in laying a foundation for the exploration of this fascinating area. The authors call for policy that reflects the need to develop social capital within multi-ethnic urban communities, and consider the potential for community initiatives to build inter-cultural cohesion. Read More Visit site £ Refugee Glasgow City Journal article
Dillon, S (2013) The Impact of Migrant Children in Glasgow Schools Dillon (2013) examines educational attainment within two publicly funded Glasgow secondary schools with contrasting experience of migrant pupils. The research focused on migrant children who do not have English as their first language and compared them to locally born children with English as their first language. The study also includes accounts from teaching staff located across the city with experience of teaching classes comprised of migrant and native children. Overall, analysis of both schools showed that while it cannot be said that migrants had improved attainment, there is also no evidence of migrants having impacted negatively on either school’s overall attainment figures. Moreover, migrant children were found to enhance classroom discussion providing a different worldview for their peers and some mainstream teachers. This suggests that their presence has a positive impact. The research was conducted as part of a collaborative master’s project at the University of Glasgow involving COSLA Strategic Migration Partnership and Glasgow City Council’s English as an Additional Language (EAL) Service in association with Glasgow Refugee, Asylum and Migration Network (GRAMNet). See also Foley (2013) for a look at EAL policy and practice. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Independent research
Glasgow Housing Association (2008) Housing migrant workers: the impact on GHA From 2004 onwards, Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) has experienced an increase in demand for its homes and housing services from migrant workers. GHA therefore commissioned this study to better understand the needs of its newly arrived population. Migrants’ experiences of GHA housing provision are presented and discussed. The report also seeks to ascertain how GHA and other Local Housing Organisation services have been impacted by immigration. With a specific focus on A8 migrants to Glasgow, the study explores the impact on operational management experienced by these organisations when housing such a diverse group of workers with diverse linguistic and cultural characteristics. Although most A8 migrant workers opt for private rented accommodation, the study found that GHA housing was regarded as a more affordable and secure housing choice, and that such choice plays a key role when it comes to decisions regarding long-term settlement. Read More Visit site Free EU Glasgow City Third sector
Hopkins (2004) Young Muslim men in Scotland: inclusions and exclusions In the context of a post 9/11 world, Hopkins (2004) examines the complex issues surrounding national identity for young Scottish Muslim men. With a focus on Scotland’s two main urban centres (Glasgow and Edinburgh) the study presents the views of the young Muslim men gathered through focus groups and interviews. The study finds that those who display visible markers of their Islamic identity within the Muslim community are more marginalised within Scottish society. For more studies on this topic, see the same authors’ later works; Hopkins (2007b) which challenges the view that Scotland’s youth are disengaged from mainstream politics, Hopkins (2007a) a study of the importance of global connections for young Scottish Muslim men and Hopkins (2009) a study which focuses on the experience of young Muslim men in Edinburgh and Glasgow within the context of debates around masculinity. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City, City of Edinburgh Journal article
Hopkins (2009) Responding to the ‘crisis of masculinity’: the perspectives of young Muslim men from Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland This study by Hopkins (2009) examines the experience of young Muslim men in Edinburgh and Glasgow within the context of debate around masculinity. The author reveals how issues such as social class, family expectation and the young men’s own interests are part of an intricate set of issues which inform their response to questions of masculinity. The study is a welcome addition to the literature on an under-researched group within a context that is more often than not centred on the experiences of white working class youth and young black men. For further studies on Muslim masculinities and gender see Hopkins (2004) which examines the complexity of national identity for young Scottish Muslim men, Siraj (2009) which explores Muslim attitudes towards homosexuality and perceptions of gender; Siraj (2010) on how Muslim couples employ religion in reproduction of patriarchal family structures and gendered identities and Siraj (2014) who explores how Muslim men construct and articulate their masculine identity. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City, City of Edinburgh Journal article

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