Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Hickman, Crowley, Mai (2008), Immigration and social cohesion in the UK The rhythms and realities of everyday life This research set out to improve our understanding of the relationship between new immigration and social cohesion by exploring the rhythms and realities of everyday life of both the long-term settled and new arrival residents. The research is based on the premise that everyday realities in the UK are under pressure from the forces of individualisation, globalisation and post-industrialism, which structure the lives of the long-term settled and new immigrants alike. We aimed to investigate the strategies people deployed, in a time of far-reaching changes, to meet their perceived priorities and needs. In current public debates, there is an association made between increasing ethnic and religious diversity and the erosion of social cohesion. However, recent research has shown that age, class and where we live are far more important in shaping life chances than are ethnicity or religion and that the arrival of new migrant groups did not coincide with an increase in crime. We explored the relations between and within long-term resident and new arrival groups and the impact of social and economic transformations in six sites across the UK: • England:Leicester; • England: London, Downham; • England: London, Kilburn; • England: Peterborough and Thetford; • Northern Ireland: Dungannon; • Scotland:Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free UK Research Report
Jones (2012) Country research report – United Kingdom Jones (2012) presents research (including a case study of Glasgow) as part of a transnational research project seeking to foster good practice and strategies for promotion of migrant integration at regional and local levels. The study includes discussion of a Migration Policy Toolkit developed by COSLA Strategic Migration Partnership to support Scotland’s local authorities in their efforts to understand migration and its effect on their area. The case study examines Glasgow City Council’s response to integration and highlights their production of welcome packs which have been made available in a variety of languages. Recognition of the important role children play in the integration process is a central finding emerging from the case study. It was found that there was stronger support for new migrants where families had formed social relationships through their children being schooled alongside Scottish born pupils. This support had even extended to community led anti-deportation campaigning. Though such examples are related to asylum seekers, it is argued that the same mechanisms can make a significant contribution to the building of community relationships between other migrant groups and local residents. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City, UK Academic research
Kearns and Whitley (2015) Getting There? The Effects of Functional Factors, Time and Place on the Social Integration of Migrants A survey of 1400 migrants, including many asylum seekers and refugees, living in deprived areas in Glasgow, UK is used to test hypotheses in the literature about the effects of functional factors (educational qualifications, ability to speak English, employment), time and place upon the social integration of migrants. Three aspects are considered: trust, reliance and safety; social relations; sense of community. Overall, social integration indicators were worse for migrants than for British citizens living in the same places. Functional factors were positively associated with different aspects of social integration: higher education with more neighbourly behaviours; employment with better social relations and belonging; and English language with greater reliance on others and available social support. Time was positively associated with most social integration indicators; time in the local area more so than time in the UK. Living in a regeneration area was negatively associated with many aspects of social integration. The findings raise questions about the doubly negative effects of the use of dispersal policy for asylum seekers to regeneration areas, necessitating secondary relocation of migrants through further, forced onward migration. Read More Visit site £ UK, Glasgow, Scotland Article
Kozłowska, Sallah, Galasiński (2008), Migration, Stress and Mental Health: An Exploratory Study of Post-accession Polish Immigrants to the United Kingdom This study addresses a gap in the literature on mental health of post-accession Polish migrants to the United Kingdom. It was designed in response to an influx of migration from the ‘new’ to ‘old’ European countries and the first reports indicating distress among these migrants (Healthcare Commission, 2005 and 2006). This report presents prevalence of mental distress among these migrants and the pressure points threatening their mental well-being. Read More Visit site Free EU UK Research Report
Levecque and Van Rossem (2014) Depression in Europe: Does migrant integration have mental health payoffs? A cross-national comparison of 20 European countries In this comparative study of twenty European countries Levecque and Van Rossem (2014) look at how migrant mental health may potentially be affected by integration policies, and therefore of relevance to any host country. The UK is included in the study, though Scotland is not discussed separately. The study focuses on depression, analysing data at both national and individual levels and takes recognised barriers to integration (i.e. economic, employment, education, status, discrimination and state integration policies) into account. The study finds that first generation migrants (both EU and non-EU migrants) experience depression at proportionately higher rates than native populations. A higher incidence is however experienced by those born outside Europe. This pattern also appears following analysis of data for second-generation migrants. The authors find that barriers to socio-economic integration and discriminatory processes are more significant for these findings than a migrant’s specific ethnic minority background. Read More Visit site £ UK Journal article
McCollum et al. (2012) Spatial, sectoral and temporal trends in A8 migration;to the UK 2004-2011. Evidence from the worker registration scheme This report by McCollum et al. (2012) presents analysis of Worker Registration Scheme (WRS) data to illuminate migration flow trends. The WRS scheme did not require all migrants to register on the scheme (unemployed and self-employed migrants not having to register, those who did so often failed to re-register following a change in employment). Nonetheless, the data set remains a principal source for the temporal analysis of A8 migrants in the labour market at both local and national levels. The study confirms that agricultural and hospitality sectors are key areas for migrant labour. This is the case both in Scotland and across the UK. Though, as A8 migrants to Scotland are less likely to gain employment through recruitment agencies, the authors suggest that direct employment is more common in Scotland. The findings and detailed analysis in this report, clearly contribute to a greater understanding of migration patterns and required responses at both local and national government levels. Read More Visit site Free EU Scotland, UK Independent research
McCollum et al. (2014) Public attitudes towards migration in Scotland: Exceptionality and possible policy implications McCollum et al. (2014) challenge the common perception that Scots are more welcoming to migrants than their UK counterparts: a view often upheld by Scottish politicians against the political backdrop of the Scottish and UK Governments’ divergence on immigration policy. Although the authors do find evidence of favourable attitudes towards migration among the Scottish public (these attitudes are perhaps explained by historic immigration and emigration to and from Scotland) they also highlight emerging attitudes of opposition to migration. As the authors point out, such findings clearly have implications for policy debates on future immigration and constitutional change in Scotland. For further studies on attitudes to discrimination in Scotland see Bromley et al. (2007) and Lewis (2006) who examines Scottish attitudes towards asylum seekers and refugees. Also see Scottish Government (2013b) which provides a review of equality and ethnicity issues and includes discussion of attitudes to racial discrimination. Tindal et al. (2014b) discuss immigration policy and constitutional change from the perspective of Scottish employers and industry. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, UK Academic journal
MOVING ON? DISPERSAL POLICY, ONWARD MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION OF REFUGEES IN THE UK Since 2000, the UK has operated compulsory dispersal, a policy designed to ‘spread the burden’ of housing asylum seekers who require accommodation across the UK and to discourage long-term settlement in London and the South East. To enhance understanding of refugee integration, this research discusses the two-year (2012–14), ESRC-funded project, in which the geography of onward migration amongst refugees dispersed across the UK as asylum seekers was mapped. The findings are based on 83 in-depth interviews with refugees, analysis of Refugee Integration and Employment Service (RIES) client data (2008–11) and analysis of the Home Office Survey of New Refugees (SNR) data (2005–09) for four different sites across the UK: Glasgow, Cardiff, Manchester and London. The report explores the main factors that influence refugees’ decisions to stay in a town or city or move on and considered how this affects the process of integration. Finally, the report examines the policy implications for the different levels of government, service providers and the voluntary sector of the long-term impact of UK dispersal policy on refugee onward migration and integration. The report weaves together quantitative and qualitative data analysis findings to address key questions surrounding refugee onward migration and integration outcomes. Read More Visit site UK Research Report
Mulvey (2010) When policy creates politics: The problematizing of immigration and the consequences for refugee integration This article by Mulvey (2010) presents the argument that the problems of integration for migrants, in particular asylum seekers and refugees, stems from a hostile political environment. The author contends that asylum seekers were firstly constructed as a threat by way of New Labour asylum policy and associated rhetoric that accompanied policy-making – such construction presented immigration as a problem and in turn created a sense of crisis within the domain of policy making – in turn the author argues, the crisis then fostered hostility within the general population towards migrants. This article clearly highlights the importance of the consideration of context in examining the policy-making processes of Government, and that the way policy is made is central to how it is subsequently received by the public. See also Bowes et al. (2008) for another study which assesses asylum policy and asylum experiences in a Scottish context, and Lewis (2006) who examines attitudes found within Scotland towards asylum seekers and refugees. Read More Visit site Free Refugee, Asylum seeker UK Journal article
Snyder (2011) Un/settling Angels: Faith-based organizations and asylum-seeking in the UK Snyder (2011) investigates the rationale behind Church support for people seeking asylum in Scotland. The author also discusses the challenges and impediments such faith-based organisations face when attempting to provide such support. The study centres on three key aspects of religious organisations’ activities in relation to their work with asylum seekers. These are transcendent motivation, organisation and strategies and mobilisation of resources. The study reviews the aspects of support the Church provides to aid settlement. Pastoral care, worship and advocacy aimed to help new arrivals settle are discussed in addition to church-led efforts designed to question negative attitudes, raise awareness and influence Government policy. By exploring how churches work with people seeking asylum, the study contributes to the under-researched area of the role played by faith-based organisations in supporting new arrivals to the UK. The research demonstrates the strong contribution churches make to the provision of support for asylum seekers. The author proposes that more work needs to be done to explore non-Christian engagement in this area. Read More Visit site £ Asylum seeker, Refugee UK Journal article

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