Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Hopkins (2004) Young Muslim men in Scotland: inclusions and exclusions In the context of a post 9/11 world, Hopkins (2004) examines the complex issues surrounding national identity for young Scottish Muslim men. With a focus on Scotland’s two main urban centres (Glasgow and Edinburgh) the study presents the views of the young Muslim men gathered through focus groups and interviews. The study finds that those who display visible markers of their Islamic identity within the Muslim community are more marginalised within Scottish society. For more studies on this topic, see the same authors’ later works; Hopkins (2007b) which challenges the view that Scotland’s youth are disengaged from mainstream politics, Hopkins (2007a) a study of the importance of global connections for young Scottish Muslim men and Hopkins (2009) a study which focuses on the experience of young Muslim men in Edinburgh and Glasgow within the context of debates around masculinity. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City, City of Edinburgh Journal article
Hopkins (2009) Responding to the ‘crisis of masculinity’: the perspectives of young Muslim men from Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland This study by Hopkins (2009) examines the experience of young Muslim men in Edinburgh and Glasgow within the context of debate around masculinity. The author reveals how issues such as social class, family expectation and the young men’s own interests are part of an intricate set of issues which inform their response to questions of masculinity. The study is a welcome addition to the literature on an under-researched group within a context that is more often than not centred on the experiences of white working class youth and young black men. For further studies on Muslim masculinities and gender see Hopkins (2004) which examines the complexity of national identity for young Scottish Muslim men, Siraj (2009) which explores Muslim attitudes towards homosexuality and perceptions of gender; Siraj (2010) on how Muslim couples employ religion in reproduction of patriarchal family structures and gendered identities and Siraj (2014) who explores how Muslim men construct and articulate their masculine identity. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City, City of Edinburgh Journal article
Moskal (2014) Polish migrant youth in Scottish schools: Conflicted identity and family capital Moskal (2014) presents research based on a study which draws upon observation of Polish migrant children in their home and school environments. Detailed interviews allowed the children and young people’s perspectives to be brought to the fore. The study also included input from the parents of the seventeen young participants. The overall focus of the study was on experiences of school transition for first generation migrants. This was framed within a context of transferability of educational success and social mobility. Drawing upon sociological theory, Moskal (2014) covers a range of concepts including the family, social and cultural capital. The author then discusses the potential use of policy and practice to support young migrants. See also a briefing paper by Moskal (2010) exploring the integration of Polish migrant children to Scotland through an examination of the role of schools in the integration process. Moskal et al. (2010) reflects on educational initiatives and policy and the need to consider migration processes. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh, North Lanarkshire, Aberdeen City Journal article
Schleef et al. (2011) Teenagers acquisition of variation: A comparison of locally-born and migrant teens realisation of English (ing) in Edinburgh and London Schleef et al. (2011) give a fascinating insight into Polish migrant teenagers’ acquisition of English. The authors examine how the teenagers acquire local English speech variations. With case study sites in London and Edinburgh, the study finds that Polish adolescents absorb and replicate the variations of English they hear from their local-born peers. This phenomenon occurs in both cities. Interestingly, in some cases, the Polish teenagers also introduce new variations into the speech of their locally-born peers. The study reflects a consequence of the significant numbers of Polish migrants to the UK. The research also raises questions that are applicable to other non-English speaking migrant groups and, for studies concerned with how migrants learn and interact using the English language at a local level. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh, England Journal article
Scott (2014) ESOL & Me ESOL & Me is a film made by language learners who attend CLD ESOL Speakeasy for Young People, Edinburgh. Read More Visit site Free City of Edinburgh Film
Ugolini (2006) Memory, war and the Italians in Edinburgh: The role of communal myth With a focus on Edinburgh, this article by Ugolini (2006) sheds light on the diverse experiences of Italian immigrants during the Second World War when Britain and Italy were on opposing sides. This was a distressing time for many Italian immigrants across Britain (many were forced to relocate or moved to internment camps). The range of experiences in the Italian community have been suppressed and lost over time, supplanted by a dominant elite mythical narrative. Ugolini (2006) examines the construction of such lasting myths and frames the animosity shown towards the Italian community in wartime Britain within a context of reflection on general anti-alien sentiment. Also see Ugolini (2013) for a related study. Read More Visit site £ City of Edinburgh Journal article
Weishaar (2010) “You have to be flexible”—Coping among polish migrant workers in Scotland In this study Weishaar (2010) builds on earlier work (See Weishaar 2008) to provide further examples of the difficulties Polish economic migrants face when trying to cope with migration. With a focus on Edinburgh, Weishaar (2010) provides a detailed account of the successful strategies Poles employ to offset the strain of migration. The study is based on focus groups and interview data. Findings reveal that respondents are resourceful and resilient and that social support needs to be an integral part of the adjustment process. The findings discussed in this study have implications for any host country with considerable migrant populations. A better understanding of the relationship between coping with migration and health, coupled with more targeted support, may have considerable benefits for public health. Also see the report by Love et al. (2007) on the specific health needs of Polish migrants in Aberdeenshire and NHS Grampian region. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh Journal article