Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
de Lima et al. (2011) Community consultation on poverty and ethnicity in Scotland The study by de Lima et al. (2011) seeks better understanding of income disparity and associated levels of poverty across a number of ethnic groups. Low paid Chinese, Eastern European, white Scottish and Traveller ethnic groups are included in the study. Research is conducted in Fife and Highland regions and local stakeholders contribute to the data that is analysed. Interviews sought to examine the perceptions of meaning and causes of poverty, its impact and the strategies employed to manage and ultimately escape the poverty trap. The study provides a fascinating insight into first-hand accounts of different ethnic groups’ experiences of poverty in Scotland. The subsequent discussion of policy implications is also valuable. See Barnard and Turner (2011) which examines evidence on the relationship between poverty and ethnicity across a number of domains, likewise Netto et al. (2011) and Hudson et al. (2013) which examines the link between ethnicity and poverty experienced by low paid workers. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Fife Third sector
Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) ‘We're still human beings, we're not aliens’: promoting the citizenship rights and cultural diversity of Traveller children in schools: Scottish and English perspectives Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) draw attention to the difficulties faced by Traveller children (including experiences of prejudice and incidences of racism), crucially the authors then explore how their marginalisation can be addressed through full inclusion within the school environment. Scottish and English case studies are used within their analysis. This is achieved by analysing Traveller children’s own accounts of the experience of attending school and includes children’s perceptions of their teachers’ views of them. The authors find that Traveller children are far from considered equal in terms of citizenship within the school environment and in effect retain ‘outsider’ status. See also Shubin (2011) which examines how Scottish Travellers itinerant lifestyle impacts on their access to - and participation in- Scottish society, Bromley et al. (2007) which reports on Scottish attitudes to discrimination, finds a prevalence of prejudice towards Traveller/Gypsy communities and, de Lima et al. (2011) which includes consideration of Traveller ethnicity within a study of ethnicity and poverty. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, England Journal article
Shubin (2011) “Where Can a Gypsy Stop?” Rethinking mobility in Scotland Shubin (2011) provides a socio-cultural study examining how access and participation within Scottish society is impacted on by Scottish Travellers’ itinerant lifestyle. In addition, the research looks at how the Traveller way of life is portrayed. Moves to accommodate the practice of Scotland’s Traveller community (both politically and economically) are assessed through analysis of empirical research findings. As a result, Shubin (2011) is able to examine how general understandings of Traveller practice neglect key elements of their nomadic way of life. Formal definitions of travel are found to be constrictive and serve only to perpetuate Traveller marginalisation. For further studies on mobility and exclusion, see Shubin (2012a), Shubin (2012b) and Shubin and Dickey (2013). Also see Bromley et al. (2007) on Scottish attitudes to discrimination, de Lima et al. (2011) includes consideration of Traveller ethnicity within a study of ethnicity and poverty and Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) discuss how marginalisation of Traveller children can be addressed within the school environment. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article