Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Hickman, Crowley, Mai (2008), Immigration and social cohesion in the UK The rhythms and realities of everyday life This research set out to improve our understanding of the relationship between new immigration and social cohesion by exploring the rhythms and realities of everyday life of both the long-term settled and new arrival residents. The research is based on the premise that everyday realities in the UK are under pressure from the forces of individualisation, globalisation and post-industrialism, which structure the lives of the long-term settled and new immigrants alike. We aimed to investigate the strategies people deployed, in a time of far-reaching changes, to meet their perceived priorities and needs. In current public debates, there is an association made between increasing ethnic and religious diversity and the erosion of social cohesion. However, recent research has shown that age, class and where we live are far more important in shaping life chances than are ethnicity or religion and that the arrival of new migrant groups did not coincide with an increase in crime. We explored the relations between and within long-term resident and new arrival groups and the impact of social and economic transformations in six sites across the UK: • England:Leicester; • England: London, Downham; • England: London, Kilburn; • England: Peterborough and Thetford; • Northern Ireland: Dungannon; • Scotland:Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free UK Research Report
Threadgold and Court (2005) Refugee inclusion: A literature review Threadgold and Court (2005) review the existing body of literature on refugee integration, evaluating the evolution and use of key terms and associated concepts. The authors address the topic from a European Union perspective examining UK Government Policy, the situation regarding integration in Scotland (including a discussion of Scottish Government policy) and the situation in Wales. The study also discusses integration in the context of indicators such as housing, health and social care welfare and education. Community safety, interaction and cohesion, employment and training and the role of the voluntary sector are also included in the analysis. This paper is an informative discussion on the history and policy relating to integration, inclusion and social cohesion. The study highlights issues of language and translation support and discusses the link between poverty and deprivation and social exclusion. The authors underscore the need to better inform host communities in order to combat negative attitudes. These are cross-cutting themes which should be considered within policy. Read More Visit site Free Refugee Scotland, Wales, UK Academic research