Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
A guide for refugee parents about schools and learning in Scotland Answers to frequently asked questions about school education in Scotland. Useful websites for refugee parents in Scotland. Read More Visit site Scotland Education Scotland document
Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) ‘We're still human beings, we're not aliens’: promoting the citizenship rights and cultural diversity of Traveller children in schools: Scottish and English perspectives Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) draw attention to the difficulties faced by Traveller children (including experiences of prejudice and incidences of racism), crucially the authors then explore how their marginalisation can be addressed through full inclusion within the school environment. Scottish and English case studies are used within their analysis. This is achieved by analysing Traveller children’s own accounts of the experience of attending school and includes children’s perceptions of their teachers’ views of them. The authors find that Traveller children are far from considered equal in terms of citizenship within the school environment and in effect retain ‘outsider’ status. See also Shubin (2011) which examines how Scottish Travellers itinerant lifestyle impacts on their access to - and participation in- Scottish society, Bromley et al. (2007) which reports on Scottish attitudes to discrimination, finds a prevalence of prejudice towards Traveller/Gypsy communities and, de Lima et al. (2011) which includes consideration of Traveller ethnicity within a study of ethnicity and poverty. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, England Journal article
HMIe (2009) Count us in: Meeting the needs of children and young people newly arrived in Scotland This report by HM Inspectorate of Education is primarily intended for teaching staff and support workers involved in pre-school centres, primary and secondary schools. The report would also be of interest however to a wide range of parties interested in supporting migrant children and their families such as community learning and development staff, English as an additional language and bilingual support services staff, youth workers, voluntary organisations, and community and faith groups. The report discusses the practices Scottish schools have adopted to provide support for newly arrived migrant children and their families – this includes examples of measures introduced by school staff to help new arrivals feel welcome, increase their confidence and fulfil their potential. In addition, the report also highlights areas where Scottish schools and education authorities could improve their provision of learning and support for all learners. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Scottish Government
Moskal (2010) Polish migrant children's experiences of schooling and home-school relations in Scotland This briefing paper by Moskal (2010) discusses the integration of Polish migrant children through the examination of the role of Scottish schools in the integration process. The focus of the study accounts for the significance the school experience for children and, the links between success at school and home environment. After English, Polish is now the most common language in Scottish schools, consequently this creates a resource issue in terms of English language tuition. This paper also draws attention to the difficulties faced in trying to accurately establish an appropriate learning level for each new arrival. This is particularly the case when children arrive at their new school without information on their previous school work or achievements. This matter is compounded further in a system of formative assessment which focuses predominantly on language ability. In addition, the study identifies communication problems which can emerge between the family/ parents and the school. In such cases, children themselves can play a key role in bridging the gap. Also see Moskal (2014) and Dillon (2013) for studies exploring some of the issues discussed in this paper. Read More Visit site Free EU Scotland Academic research