Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Guma, Taulant (2015) The ethnicisation of need: questioning the role of ethnicity in the provision of support and services for post-accession migrants in Glasgow This policy paper focuses on the role that ethnicity played in the provision of support and services for post-accession migrants living in Glasgow, based on intensive ethnographic fieldwork conducted throughout 2012 with Czech- and Slovak-speaking migrants living in the city. It is based on the PhD research project ‘Everyday negotiations of in/securities and risks: an ethnographic study amongst Czech- and Slovak-speaking migrants in Glasgow’ which was co-funded by the ESRC and Glasgow City Council. The paper argues that using ethnicity as a straightforward, ‘naturally existing’ category and making it a requirement for individuals’ access to certain services has problematic implications for affected migrants as well as service providers and policy-makers. Read More Visit site Free EU, A8 Glasgow Academic research
Hepburn (2011) ‘Citizens of the region’: Party conceptions of regional citizenship and immigrant integration Locating Scotland within studies of Catalonia and Quebec, Hepburn (2011) comparatively explores questions of regional citizenship in relation to immigration and decentralised power within states. In terms of Scotland, the author outlines the Scottish Government and Scottish National Party response to the constraints on immigration policy emanating from a policy area reserved for Westminster, intended to overcome demographic instability and the subsequent concessions made by the UK Government. Covering aspects of citizenship such as rights, participation, and membership (in terms of sense of belonging and identity) the author identifies a number of specific factors, including evidence of political consensus on immigration and a notable absence of far right political parties opposed to immigration in Scotland, alongside Scottish National Party promotion of an open, civic model of citizenship for migrants within an independent Scotland. In this study of an important aspect of migrant integration, Hepburn (2011) highlights the regional differences found in relation to citizenship and its reconfiguration at the sub state level and of citizenship as being inherently linked to immigration policy. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, Catalonia Journal article
Mulvey (2017) Social citizenship, social policy and refugee integration: a case of policy divergence in Scotland. The relationship between Holyrood and Westminster is an evolving one where there is some evidence of policy divergence. Underpinning policy approaches are different views of social citizenship, with the Holyrood approach maintaining elements of the post-1945 welfare settlement. The place of refugees and asylum seekers within these differing approaches is currently underexplored. This article looks at the Scottish and UK Governments’ views of social rights and how they apply to asylum seekers and refugees. It suggests that despite refugee ‘policy’ being at least partly reserved, the Scottish Government has been able to take a different approach from that of Westminster, an approach underpinned by these differing welfare outlooks. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Academic journal
Poole and Adamson (2008) Report on the situation of the Roma community in Govanhill, Glasgow This report by Poole and Adamson (2008) is published by Oxfam and jointly funded by the Glasgow South East Community Health and Care Partnership. The research underscores the position of the Roma as Europe’s most vulnerable and deprived ethnic group. The report concentrates on the Slovak Roma community living in Glasgow’s Govanhill area. The authors urge key stakeholders to continue to recognise the distinct needs of this social group, while also acknowledging that so doing should not be at the expense of others within the community. As such, the authors advocate targeted initiatives aimed at the Roma community alongside development of community-wide services. Communication emerges as key to persuading Roma that community initiatives are for their benefit. The Scottish Government also has a role to play in clearly communicating the message of Roma rights and ethnic minority status to the Scottish public. The Roma community are particularly disadvantaged in the areas of health, housing and education, These issues are devolved thus the report recommends that the Scottish Government should play a more central role in addressing inequalities associated with them. Also see Poole (2010) for an examination of the exclusion and marginalisation experienced by Roma migrants in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free EU Glasgow City Third sector