Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Aspinall and Watters (2010) Refugees and asylum seekers: A review from an equality and human rights perspective Aspinall and Watters (2010) provide a comprehensive account of issues faced by refugees and asylum seekers within a number of domains including health, education and employment. The report is particularly relevant within a Scottish context as it outlines the situation found in Scotland as part of a section devoted to geographical differences within the UK. Following a brief outline of Scotland’s response to asylum seekers over past decades through the asylum dispersal programme of the UK Government and Glasgow’s principal participation, the authors provide detail of issues concerning housing; destitution; healthcare; integration of asylum seekers and refugees; children and young people; media and public attitudes, before finally touching on some of the differences found between Scottish and UK government policy. See also Ager and Strang (2010) for a study which focuses on refugee integration; Mulvey (2013); and Threadgold and Court (2005). Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Public sector
Candappa et al. (2007) Education and schooling for asylum-seeking and refugee students in Scotland: an exploratory study Candappa et al’s (2007) is a Scottish Executive Schools Directorate commissioned study which investigates the provision of education for refugee and asylum seeking pupils in Scotland. Exploring a range of related issues, the study’s principle aim was to identify best practice for integrating these pupils into the Scottish education system, based on the authors’ examination of existing provision. The study also takes account of policy and practice within two local authorities in England. The Scottish based research with chosen primary and secondary schools, was conducted in two Scottish cities (which remain anonymous in the report) and included interviews with senior staff, children and parents, in addition to a survey conducted with Scottish Education Authorities. Overall, this study highlights the numerous factors which affect refugee and asylum seeking children’s well-being, and ultimately underlines that all children in Scotland have entitlement to a full education. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland, England Scottish Government document
Deuchar (2011) People look at us the way we dress and they think we’re gangsters - bonds, bridges, gangs and refugees - A qualitative study of inter-cultural social capital in Glasgow Deuchar (2011) draws attention to the interplay between Glasgow’s youth (gang) culture and marginalisation of young refugees. The study explores the concept of inter-cultural social capital, based on assertions that those communities who exhibit higher levels of inter-cultural social capital offer optimum conditions for refugee integration. Communities in which higher levels of social bonding and disconnection are displayed are less successful when it comes to conditions for refugee integration as these factors can inhibit inter-cultural integration. It is argued that gang solidarity can even promote intolerance. Deuchar (2011) identifies gang membership, albeit territorial in nature, as providing a platform for ethnic solidarity and consequently racial prejudice. Although a small-scale study, its strength lies in laying a foundation for the exploration of this fascinating area. The authors call for policy that reflects the need to develop social capital within multi-ethnic urban communities, and consider the potential for community initiatives to build inter-cultural cohesion. Read More Visit site £ Refugee Glasgow City Journal article
European Migration Network (2013) Ad-Hoc Query on allocation of refugees to municipalities for integration purposes Intended to facilitate information exchange between EU member states, the European Migration Network (EMN) provides an interesting comparison of policy and practice (See European Migration Network) across EU Member States. Their Ad-Hoc Query on allocation of refugees to municipalities for integration purposes (2013) offers a useful resource for anyone wishing to gain a quick overview of other European regions’ policy on refugee dispersal and housing. Two questions are key to the research. The first question is: Does the member state regulate the dispersal of refugees and other persons that have been granted protection to municipalities once they have received a residence permit? The second question is: Does the member state share the Swedish experience of a general shortage of available housing for newly arrived migrants? Responses from the 23 member states who participated are presented the UK is included as a respondent. See also European Migration Network (2012) for member states responses to questions on linguistic integration. Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK, EU EU Document
Guest and Vecchia (2010) Scoping study on support mechanisms for the recognition of the skills, learning and qualifications of migrant workers and refugees This report was compiled by Guest and Vecchia (2010) for the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) Partnership. The principle aim of the study was to develop frameworks of recognition for migrant and refugee skills and qualifications. This was done to better facilitate migrant access to programmes of continuing professional development or, entry into higher echelons of employment. The lack of effective mechanisms for skills’ recognition was identified by Guest and Vecchia (2010) as a significant barrier for migrants (commensurate with findings within other research reviewed by the authors). In addition, perceptions that migrants possess limited language were compounded by negative employer attitudes. See also Smyth and Kum (2010) which investigates the barriers and discrimination faced by teachers who are either refugees or seeking asylum in Scotland when they attempt to re-enter the teaching profession. Similarly Stewart (2005) examines the impediments to employment faced by refugee doctors. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Third sector
Kearns and Whitley (2010) Health, Wellbeing and social inclusion of migrants in North Glasgow Kearns and Whitely (2010) examine the health, Wellbeing and social inclusion of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. The authors make a comparison with other residents, particularly within North Glasgow’s regeneration zones. The authors aim to establish whether or not migrants are worse off than the general population and, to identify any need for additional support. The study is based on interpretation of data from the household survey. The authors interpret the data with caution, pointing out that migrant respondents could have a different understanding of the questions being asked or may have been cautious in giving their response. The study finds that although migrants appear to be generally healthy in comparison to other groups surveyed, there is evidence which points to poor social cohesion and harassment is a relatively common experience. What is more, refugees expressed greater concern over their personal safety, while the issue of social isolation were also a cause for anxiety for those seeking asylum. Read More Visit site Free Refugee, Asylum, TCN, EU Glasgow City Public sector
Kearns and Whitley (2015) Getting There? The Effects of Functional Factors, Time and Place on the Social Integration of Migrants A survey of 1400 migrants, including many asylum seekers and refugees, living in deprived areas in Glasgow, UK is used to test hypotheses in the literature about the effects of functional factors (educational qualifications, ability to speak English, employment), time and place upon the social integration of migrants. Three aspects are considered: trust, reliance and safety; social relations; sense of community. Overall, social integration indicators were worse for migrants than for British citizens living in the same places. Functional factors were positively associated with different aspects of social integration: higher education with more neighbourly behaviours; employment with better social relations and belonging; and English language with greater reliance on others and available social support. Time was positively associated with most social integration indicators; time in the local area more so than time in the UK. Living in a regeneration area was negatively associated with many aspects of social integration. The findings raise questions about the doubly negative effects of the use of dispersal policy for asylum seekers to regeneration areas, necessitating secondary relocation of migrants through further, forced onward migration. Read More Visit site £ UK, Glasgow, Scotland Article

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