Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Aspinwall (2013) The Catholic Minority Experience in Scotland: the Poorhouse View, 1850–1914 For an insight into past experience of integration into Scottish life, this paper by Aspinwall provides an insightful account of how the mass identity of Scotland’s Catholics aligned with the Roman Catholic church, as a group only advanced within Scottish society following political, social and educational changes. Such changes, most notably in voting rights, education, and the emergence of the Labour Party, coincided with a demise in church hierarchy. Until this time, the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland had galvanised a poorly educated and low skilled flock into a coherent community in the midst of poverty and deprivation. This had been achieved through building social bonds and morality by way of a conservative brand of religion, set against a backdrop of prejudice. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
Barnard and Turner (2011) Poverty and ethnicity: A review of evidence Barnard and Turner (2011) produced this report on behalf of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. It examines existing evidence on the relationship between poverty and ethnicity. The report succinctly summarises the evidence within the domains of education, work, caring, social networks, inequality and the role of place. The report also emphasises the need to understand the connection between these domains and features of ethnic identity, whether religion, age or gender related. In addition, the influence of community actions, location and broader interactions with wider structures - such as social services, the labour market and social norms - on outcomes for an individual is considered. While the report also draws attention to migrant worker susceptibility to low-paid and low-status employment, importantly, it also offers a better understanding of how to support action on poverty amongst ethnic groups. Read More Visit site Free UK Third sector
de Lima et al. (2011) Community consultation on poverty and ethnicity in Scotland The study by de Lima et al. (2011) seeks better understanding of income disparity and associated levels of poverty across a number of ethnic groups. Low paid Chinese, Eastern European, white Scottish and Traveller ethnic groups are included in the study. Research is conducted in Fife and Highland regions and local stakeholders contribute to the data that is analysed. Interviews sought to examine the perceptions of meaning and causes of poverty, its impact and the strategies employed to manage and ultimately escape the poverty trap. The study provides a fascinating insight into first-hand accounts of different ethnic groups’ experiences of poverty in Scotland. The subsequent discussion of policy implications is also valuable. See Barnard and Turner (2011) which examines evidence on the relationship between poverty and ethnicity across a number of domains, likewise Netto et al. (2011) and Hudson et al. (2013) which examines the link between ethnicity and poverty experienced by low paid workers. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Fife Third sector
Hudson et al. (2013) In-work poverty, ethnicity and workplace cultures This report by Hudson et al. (2013) supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, examines the link between ethnicity and poverty experienced by low paid workers. In doing so, the report draws attention to the barriers low paid workers face in trying to progress and develop their career. The study includes a discussion of the role played by workplace cultures in the process of finding a way out of in-work poverty. The research is based on information gathered from interviews and workshops conducted in England and Scotland in both semi-rural and urban areas (which remain anonymous in the study). The report highlights informal workplace practices which disproportionately affect ethnic minorities, serve to perpetuate in-work poverty and undermine formal equal opportunity policies. The report includes an impressive list of recommendations aimed at employers and other key stakeholders (such as national and local Government, trade unions, equalities and community organisations) and seen as pivotal for any attempts to address the imbalance. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, England Third sector
Mulvey (2014) Asylum seekers and refugees: a litmus test for Scotland? This chapter is published in an edited volume which explores the nature and extent of poverty in Scotland at the time of the referendum on independence, the chapter looks at poverty among asylum seekers and refugees in Scotland and suggests that some of the causes of that poverty lie in the UK Governments policies. Read More Visit site £ Asylum seeker Scotland Book
Netto et al. (2011) Poverty and ethnicity in Scotland This substantial report by Netto et al. (2011) examines the relationship between ethnicity and poverty as found in Scotland. The report examines ethnic minority vulnerability to poverty and considers how vulnerable groups might escape the poverty trap. Covering a wide-range of factors - including income and employment, health, educational attainment, housing and homelessness - the report also presents a review of existing statistical data with the aim of identifying potential sources of quantitative evidence. A superior evidence base would allow researchers to better gauge the incidence and extent of poverty, deprivation and related problems in Scotland’s ethnic minority populations. This report by Netto et al. (2011) goes a considerable way towards addressing the research gap in Scotland on the relationship between poverty and ethnicity. The study highlights the distinct demographic and settlement patterns found in Scotland which are unlike those found in other parts of the UK. Under-researched topic areas which would benefit from further study are also identified. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Third sector
Threadgold and Court (2005) Refugee inclusion: A literature review Threadgold and Court (2005) review the existing body of literature on refugee integration, evaluating the evolution and use of key terms and associated concepts. The authors address the topic from a European Union perspective examining UK Government Policy, the situation regarding integration in Scotland (including a discussion of Scottish Government policy) and the situation in Wales. The study also discusses integration in the context of indicators such as housing, health and social care welfare and education. Community safety, interaction and cohesion, employment and training and the role of the voluntary sector are also included in the analysis. This paper is an informative discussion on the history and policy relating to integration, inclusion and social cohesion. The study highlights issues of language and translation support and discusses the link between poverty and deprivation and social exclusion. The authors underscore the need to better inform host communities in order to combat negative attitudes. These are cross-cutting themes which should be considered within policy. Read More Visit site Free Refugee Scotland, Wales, UK Academic research