Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
European Migration Network (2013) Ad-Hoc Query on allocation of refugees to municipalities for integration purposes Intended to facilitate information exchange between EU member states, the European Migration Network (EMN) provides an interesting comparison of policy and practice (See European Migration Network) across EU Member States. Their Ad-Hoc Query on allocation of refugees to municipalities for integration purposes (2013) offers a useful resource for anyone wishing to gain a quick overview of other European regions’ policy on refugee dispersal and housing. Two questions are key to the research. The first question is: Does the member state regulate the dispersal of refugees and other persons that have been granted protection to municipalities once they have received a residence permit? The second question is: Does the member state share the Swedish experience of a general shortage of available housing for newly arrived migrants? Responses from the 23 member states who participated are presented the UK is included as a respondent. See also European Migration Network (2012) for member states responses to questions on linguistic integration. Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK, EU EU Document
Flint (2007) Faith schools, multiculturalism and community cohesion: Muslim and Roman Catholic state schools in England and Scotland Flint (2007) within a comparative examination of the development of Scotland’s Roman Catholic state schools and the emergence of England’s more recent Muslim state school sector, demonstrates that discourse associated with such faith schools replicates the tension found within conceptions of national identity, cohesion and citizenship. The author asserts that management of broader forms of diversity and the appreciation of existing inequality between religious and ethnic groups in asserting their rights and legitimacy is necessary first to foster community cohesion through education policy. The study underlines the right of minority ethnic groups to a faith-based education as part of their citizenship, which is supported by supranational legislation and highlights issues such as the tension between staff recruitment policy and such legislation. Overall, Flint (2007) provides a valuable contribution to the contemporary debate surrounding not only state provision of faith schools, but also the debate over community cohesion and citizenship. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, England Journal article
George et al. (2011) Impact of migration on the consumption of education and children’s services and the consumption of health services, social care and social services George et al. (2011) include Scotland in an analysis of UK Immigration Policy focusing on the UK’s Points Based System. Within the limitations set by available data, the study examines the financial costs involved in the provision of education, health and social services for migrants. The study also provides a review of existing literature of the impact on public services that the presence of migrants has. The authors identify the area of service impact as one that has been under-researched. They incorporate a detailed account of associated expenditure stemming from migration and suggest implications for UK immigration policy. See also Dustmann and Frattini (2011) who explore the impact of migration on public service provision, Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) who assess the impact of migration to Scotland since 2004,, a study on housing by Glasgow Housing Association (2008) and, Catto and Gorman (2010) who analyse media presentation of the impact of Central and Eastern European migration on NHS Scotland. Read More Visit site Free UK, Scotland Independent research
Goodman (2012) Fortifying Citizenship: Policy strategies for civic integration in Western Europe Goodman (2012) provides an in-depth comparative account of civic integration policy found in Western European states. Although not Scotland specific, the UK is compared with Denmark and Germany using a comparative case study approach. The case study is preceded by a more general overview of integration policy found across Europe. The study touches on the inclusive-exclusive nature of contrasting liberal and constrictive citizenship policies. The study highlights the differing strategies employed by states and the political pressures that shape citizenship policy. See also Beadle and Silverman (2007) which examines the introduction of the UK citizenship test on provision of English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in Scotland and two examples of UK policy in a European comparative context – European Migration Network (2012) on linguistic integration and Migration Network (2013) on allocation of refugees to municipalities. Read More Visit site £ UK, Denmark, Germany Journal article
Hall Aitken (2007) Outer Hebrides migration study: final report Hall Aitken (2007) delivers a substantial report which frames an examination of migration in the Outer Hebrides within a broader context of migration in comparable rural areas; areas that are also characterised by depopulation. The report explores the main causes on both in and out-migration. Consequently, the study draws out policy and practice which could potentially be utilised to encourage in-migration and reduce out-migration from rural areas. In particular, the report recommends establishing a multi-agency partnership to address a range of areas such as enterprise development, housing needs, and engagement with young people along with making those who have already left aware of current opportunities. The recommendations on migrant integration extend to awareness-raising and provision of support for existing communities during the process of integration. The recruitment of migrant outreach workers to the role of intermediaries between migrant workers and agencies is also recommended along with a full assessment of both current and future training needs among migrant workers. Read More Visit site Free Comhairle nan Eilean Siar Public sector
Hepburn (2011) ‘Citizens of the region’: Party conceptions of regional citizenship and immigrant integration Locating Scotland within studies of Catalonia and Quebec, Hepburn (2011) comparatively explores questions of regional citizenship in relation to immigration and decentralised power within states. In terms of Scotland, the author outlines the Scottish Government and Scottish National Party response to the constraints on immigration policy emanating from a policy area reserved for Westminster, intended to overcome demographic instability and the subsequent concessions made by the UK Government. Covering aspects of citizenship such as rights, participation, and membership (in terms of sense of belonging and identity) the author identifies a number of specific factors, including evidence of political consensus on immigration and a notable absence of far right political parties opposed to immigration in Scotland, alongside Scottish National Party promotion of an open, civic model of citizenship for migrants within an independent Scotland. In this study of an important aspect of migrant integration, Hepburn (2011) highlights the regional differences found in relation to citizenship and its reconfiguration at the sub state level and of citizenship as being inherently linked to immigration policy. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, Catalonia Journal article
Levecque and Van Rossem (2014) Depression in Europe: Does migrant integration have mental health payoffs? A cross-national comparison of 20 European countries In this comparative study of twenty European countries Levecque and Van Rossem (2014) look at how migrant mental health may potentially be affected by integration policies, and therefore of relevance to any host country. The UK is included in the study, though Scotland is not discussed separately. The study focuses on depression, analysing data at both national and individual levels and takes recognised barriers to integration (i.e. economic, employment, education, status, discrimination and state integration policies) into account. The study finds that first generation migrants (both EU and non-EU migrants) experience depression at proportionately higher rates than native populations. A higher incidence is however experienced by those born outside Europe. This pattern also appears following analysis of data for second-generation migrants. The authors find that barriers to socio-economic integration and discriminatory processes are more significant for these findings than a migrant’s specific ethnic minority background. Read More Visit site £ UK Journal article
McKenna (2006) Equality in Moray: Research into equalities policy and practice This study explores issues of policy and practice related to gender, disability and race equalities within Moray. It provides a considerable amount of detail on access to employment and the service needs of Moray’s established minority ethnic communities and new migrants. The study analyses findings within the context of regional racial equality policy objectives. The analysis examines reported incidents of racism, consultations with minority ethnic communities, interviews with migrant workers and a public survey conducted via the Moray Citizens Panel. The report underlines the increasing diversity of Moray’s population, identifying new migrant communities such as Polish, Portuguese and the particular Russian language translation needs of Latvian Russian speakers. Part of the research process involved reaching out to the local Chinese community, which as Moray’s largest established minority, had not previously been involved in any community planning process. Read More Visit site Free Moray Public sector
Pires and MacLeod (2006) Experience of people who relocate to Scotland This study authored by Pires and MacLeod (2006) was commissioned by the Scottish Executive and Scottish Enterprise to better understand the decision making process of migrants who choose to come to Scotland. The study explores the range of support services that migrant’s access and considers a range of other factors, in an attempt to gain an insight into migrants’ experiences and barriers they face. The research data was gathered using focus groups and interviews with both migrants and relevant stakeholder organisations. Some of the key findings to emerge from the study were that migrant motivation was often driven by an economic rationale for example, employment or study. Generally those arriving to Scotland had positive experiences to report. Few of those participating in the study had made use of publicly available support as part of their migratory process (although those who had done so did not express any dissatisfaction). Most migrants did not articulate the intention to settle on a long term basis, instead they remained open to the possibility of onward migration. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Scottish Government
Poole (2010) National Action Plans for social inclusion and A8 migrants: The case of the Roma in Scotland Set in the context of EU enlargement and inclusion policy, Poole (2010) examines the exclusion and marginalisation experienced by Roma migrants in Scotland. The author argues that Roma exclusion will continue while legislative and structural barriers persist. These barriers prohibit full participation in Scottish society and prevent Roma from making a full social contribution. These obstacles are compounded further by evident discrimination and racism, which inhibits policy implementation and prevents service providers from meeting the welfare needs of Scotland’s Roma community. These factors also negatively impact community cohesion. See also Poole and Adamson (2008) for a Glasgow based study of the Roma community, Scottish Government (2013b) for their review of equality and ethnicity in Scotland, Bromley et al. (2007) on research which asked participants in Scotland about their attitudes to discrimination, and for a study of Scottish public attitudes towards migration see McCollum et al. (2014). De Lima (2012) discusses migration, equality and discrimination within the context of social justice. Read More Visit site £ EU Scotland Journal article

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