Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Bailey et al. (1995) Pakistanis in Scotland: Census data and research issues Bailey et al (1995) highlight the significant place of the Pakistani community in Scotland as a distinct population group, particularly in terms of demographics, housing and career/occupation compared to Scotland’s wider population. Drawing upon 1991 Census data, the study examines the household composition and economic position of Scotland’s Pakistanis in addition to shedding light on their pattern of settlement across Scotland. The authors find distinct patterns emerge from the data which suggest a notable contrast with those of the general Scottish population. Although dating from 1995, the authors’ inclusion of a historical background the study provides a useful insight into one of Scotland’s important ethnic minority communities. For more on Scotland’s Pakistani community, see an earlier study by Bowes et al. (1990a) and a subsequent study by Saeed et al. (1999) which focuses on issues of identity among Glasgow’s Pakistani teenagers. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Bowes and Domokos (1993) South Asian women and health services: A study in Glasgow Bowes and Domokos (1993) examined the healthcare experience of a selection of Glasgow’s South Asian women (mostly of Punjabi origin). They investigate the women’s own experiences through interviews. The authors also discuss the experiences of the women’s families. A number of issues emerged, such as a necessity for greater translation assistance and a need to challenge discrimination and stereotyping within health service delivery; the study stresses the importance of accessing the unheard voices of this minority group by focusing centrally on their concerns over healthcare. Although the study focused on a specific ethnic minority group and dates from the 1990s, it suggests additional areas for further research and its key finding is significant: rather than cultural barriers it is the healthcare system and occurrence of racism which inhibit full access to healthcare services for South Asian women in Glasgow. Read More Visit site £ TCN Glasgow City Journal article