Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Beadle and Silverman (2007) Examining the impact of EU enlargement and the introduction of the UK citizenship test on provision of English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in Scotland Beadle and Silverman (2007) provide a comprehensive study of English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in terms of both providers and learners in Scotland. The main strength of the study is the incorporation of both ESOL provider and learner perspectives, which highlights the central place of ESOL in aiding migrant integration into Scottish society. Although the study includes consideration of private provision and provision within higher education institutions, it primarily focuses on publicly funded ESOL provision, across a range of providers including colleges, the community and voluntary sectors. Beadle and Silverman (2007) not only draw attention to an increased demand for ESOL and subsequent need for further provision, but also to an increasing need for courses within Scotland’s rural areas due to recent A8 migration. In the concluding chapter, the authors reflect upon the policy implications stemming from their findings. Read More Visit site Free EU Scotland Scottish Government document
ESOLScotland.com The ESOLScotland website provides information for learners and practitioners of English for Speakers of Other Languages. It provides information on: - ESOL Courses - Citizenship - Support for learners - Initial assessment guide - Teaching resources - Curriculum Framework - Professional Development for practitioners - Useful weblinks for learners and teachers Read More Visit site Scotland website
European Migration Network (2012) Ad-Hoc Query on Programmes for the Linguistic Integration of Immigrants The European Migration Network’s (EMN) Ad-Hoc Query on Programmes for the Linguistic Integration of Immigrants offers a useful resource for anyone wishing to gain a quick overview of policy on migrant integration in other European regions. The report details member states’ responses (including the UK) to questions on provision of national programmes for linguistic integration of both EU and non-EU migrants. The questions posed to each state cover the following areas; how programmes are funded, whether the programme provided incorporates any civic or vocational training, whether or not migrants are required to contribute financially to participate in the programme, any adaptations made for different target groups (such as illiterate or highly educated) and, whether or not the programmes are compulsory or offered on a voluntary basis. See also European Migration Network (2013). Read More Visit site Free EU, Non-EU UK, EU EU Document
Learning Link Scotland (2007) ESOL in Scotland's voluntary sector This report by Learning Link Scotland (2007) investigates existing provision of English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in Scotland’s voluntary sector. The report highlights areas of good practice and work which could be shared more widely across Scotland. It also provides research-generated recommendations. As such, the report meets its central aim of strengthening the infrastructure associated with ESOL provision at national and local levels. The report concludes with a list of ESOL related contacts which is a useful resource. Also see ESOL Scotland for a number of accessible online resources, a scoping study by Rice et al. (2004) and Rice et al. (2008) for a study pertaining to publically funded courses, Weedon et al. (2011) for a workplace context and Beadle and Silverman (2007) for a study which incorporates both provider and learner perspectives. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Third sector
McAdam and Arizpe (2011) Journeys into culturally responsive teaching This paper by McAdam and Arizpe (2011) discusses research connected to a comparative project which included research in Scotland, Australia, Spain and the USA. The authors present the views of three teachers who participated in the project which explored how both Scottish and migrant children reflect upon their own experiences of migration. How the same children reflect on the experiences of other children is also considered. This is achieved through engagement with contemporary picture books. The study involved small groups of mostly ethnic minority children and also included new arrival children who had recently migrated to Scotland either as children of refugees, asylum seekers or migrant workers. The children shared in common the experience of an interruption to their journey from their country of origin to Scotland. This paper presents the teachers’ responses to the learning strategies employed rather than the projects central focus which was on the children’s responses to the picture books. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Journal article
Schleef et al. (2011) Teenagers acquisition of variation: A comparison of locally-born and migrant teens realisation of English (ing) in Edinburgh and London Schleef et al. (2011) give a fascinating insight into Polish migrant teenagers’ acquisition of English. The authors examine how the teenagers acquire local English speech variations. With case study sites in London and Edinburgh, the study finds that Polish adolescents absorb and replicate the variations of English they hear from their local-born peers. This phenomenon occurs in both cities. Interestingly, in some cases, the Polish teenagers also introduce new variations into the speech of their locally-born peers. The study reflects a consequence of the significant numbers of Polish migrants to the UK. The research also raises questions that are applicable to other non-English speaking migrant groups and, for studies concerned with how migrants learn and interact using the English language at a local level. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh, England Journal article
Welcoming Our Learners: Scotland’s ESOL Strategy 2015 - 2020 The English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Strategy for Adults in Scotland 2015 provides the strategic direction to ensure we continue to support high quality learning and teaching of English language in Scotland. Read More Visit site Scotland Strategy document