Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Aspinall and Watters (2010) Refugees and asylum seekers: A review from an equality and human rights perspective Aspinall and Watters (2010) provide a comprehensive account of issues faced by refugees and asylum seekers within a number of domains including health, education and employment. The report is particularly relevant within a Scottish context as it outlines the situation found in Scotland as part of a section devoted to geographical differences within the UK. Following a brief outline of Scotland’s response to asylum seekers over past decades through the asylum dispersal programme of the UK Government and Glasgow’s principal participation, the authors provide detail of issues concerning housing; destitution; healthcare; integration of asylum seekers and refugees; children and young people; media and public attitudes, before finally touching on some of the differences found between Scottish and UK government policy. See also Ager and Strang (2010) for a study which focuses on refugee integration; Mulvey (2013); and Threadgold and Court (2005). Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Public sector
Candappa et al. (2007) Education and schooling for asylum-seeking and refugee students in Scotland: an exploratory study Candappa et al’s (2007) is a Scottish Executive Schools Directorate commissioned study which investigates the provision of education for refugee and asylum seeking pupils in Scotland. Exploring a range of related issues, the study’s principle aim was to identify best practice for integrating these pupils into the Scottish education system, based on the authors’ examination of existing provision. The study also takes account of policy and practice within two local authorities in England. The Scottish based research with chosen primary and secondary schools, was conducted in two Scottish cities (which remain anonymous in the report) and included interviews with senior staff, children and parents, in addition to a survey conducted with Scottish Education Authorities. Overall, this study highlights the numerous factors which affect refugee and asylum seeking children’s well-being, and ultimately underlines that all children in Scotland have entitlement to a full education. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland, England Scottish Government document
de Lima (2010) Boundary crossings: Migration, belonging/‘un-belonging’ in rural Scotland With migration seen as a means of tackling rural population decline, de Lima (2010) challenges the perception of rural areas as being both devoid of migration and culturally homogenous. He contrasts this view with perceptions of municipal landscapes as cosmopolitan in outlook and the only locations where ethnic minorities can be found in Scotland. The study provides an intriguing account of identity and the sense of belonging held by international migrants to Scotland’s rural areas. The study is also an examination of the fluidity and plurality found within rural spaces, which also introduces the reader to the concept of ‘translocalism’. For additional studies on migrant labour in rural Scotland, also see de Lima and Wright (2009) who also explore both the role and the impact of migrant workers in rural communities, de Lima (2007) which finds migrants to be integral to the rural workforce and, Danson and Jentsch (2009) which focuses on processes on inclusion and exclusion. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
Haghighi and Lynch (2012) Entrepreneurship and the social integration of new minorities: Iranian hospitality entrepreneurs in Scotland This study by Haghighi and Lynch (2012) explores the relationship between Iranian entrepreneurship and integration within Scotland’s hospitality and tourism sector, to examine whether it aids their integration process or acts as a barrier. Haghighi and Lynch (2012) find that paradoxically, minority entrepreneurship within the hospitality sector on the one hand promotes economic integration through capital, but on the other hand hinders their social and cultural integration and therefore can be either a facilitator or a barrier to integration for minorities. The authors contend subsequently that integration should be considered as a continuum as opposed to being viewed as being attained through reaching a prescribed point, with integration resting between the opposing points of isolation and assimilation – evidenced by those who participated in the study as having identified themselves as being located at neither opposing point. As such, the study suggests that ultimately complete integration is impossible for those who participated due to high levels of cultural differences between original and host cultures. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Hall Aitken (2007) Outer Hebrides migration study: final report Hall Aitken (2007) delivers a substantial report which frames an examination of migration in the Outer Hebrides within a broader context of migration in comparable rural areas; areas that are also characterised by depopulation. The report explores the main causes on both in and out-migration. Consequently, the study draws out policy and practice which could potentially be utilised to encourage in-migration and reduce out-migration from rural areas. In particular, the report recommends establishing a multi-agency partnership to address a range of areas such as enterprise development, housing needs, and engagement with young people along with making those who have already left aware of current opportunities. The recommendations on migrant integration extend to awareness-raising and provision of support for existing communities during the process of integration. The recruitment of migrant outreach workers to the role of intermediaries between migrant workers and agencies is also recommended along with a full assessment of both current and future training needs among migrant workers. Read More Visit site Free Comhairle nan Eilean Siar Public sector
Jentsch et al. (2007) Migrant workers in rural Scotland: ‘going to the middle of nowhere’ This paper explores international migration to rural Scotland. The study finds that rural development is crucial for the creation of an environment that is both welcoming and meets the aspirations of migrant workers. Although improvement has been made in attempts to facilitate integration, it is the networks that develop between migrants that are perhaps the most significant factor for their integration. These links allow migrants to benefit from the experience of earlier arrivals. Recruitment agencies can also play a similar – integrative -role. With the experiences of both migrants and employers represented, Jentsch et al. (2007) highlight the lack of high-level employment opportunities as an obstacle to long-term settlement. As has already been seen among the youth in rural communities, migrants too may leave in search of better opportunities. The authors also find debate on migration in Scotland to be less focused on ethnicity, and caution that, should more non-accession state migrants arrive, without an accompanying positive discourse the debate may develop into one that reflects the levels of negativity which surround the issue of migration in the rest of the UK. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Moray, Orkney Islands Journal article
Karibu Scotland (2012) Karibu Annual Report The Karibu Scotland (2012) annual report provides an update of the activities of this organisation which provides key support for African women in Glasgow. Promotion of integration is a fundamental part to Karibu Scotland’s work. The organisation works primarily to facilitate the integration of refugee and asylum seeking African women into Scottish society. Karibu provides support to empower African woman and help them access services. The report provides a brief insight into the organisations range of activities designed to aid integration. Karibu runs a sewing project which has resulted in some of the women acquiring skills that have lead to employment. Some women have also begun selling some of their work successfully in one of Oxfam’s Glasgow stores. An enterprising project - the Taste of Africa Café - provides outside catering. In addition, a number of fundraising events are run by Karibu. The report concludes by outlining some of the challenges which lie ahead for Karibu Scotland alongside the organisation’s plans for the future. Read More Visit site Free TCN Glasgow City Third sector

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