Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Aspinall and Watters (2010) Refugees and asylum seekers: A review from an equality and human rights perspective Aspinall and Watters (2010) provide a comprehensive account of issues faced by refugees and asylum seekers within a number of domains including health, education and employment. The report is particularly relevant within a Scottish context as it outlines the situation found in Scotland as part of a section devoted to geographical differences within the UK. Following a brief outline of Scotland’s response to asylum seekers over past decades through the asylum dispersal programme of the UK Government and Glasgow’s principal participation, the authors provide detail of issues concerning housing; destitution; healthcare; integration of asylum seekers and refugees; children and young people; media and public attitudes, before finally touching on some of the differences found between Scottish and UK government policy. See also Ager and Strang (2010) for a study which focuses on refugee integration; Mulvey (2013); and Threadgold and Court (2005). Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Public sector
Bowes et al. (1990a) The changing nature of Glasgow's ethnic‐minority community Bowes et al (1990a) chart the changes exhibited by ethnic minority groups in Glasgow (mainly within the context of council housing). The discussion is based on data gathered as part of an earlier local authority funded study. The paper incorporated data from the electoral register, which although limited in some respects, was nonetheless the best data available on household composition. The data are complemented by a household survey undertaken by the authors. The analysis shows the average ethnic minority household size as notably greater than the overall Glasgow average. In addition, the paper discusses ethnic minority employment patterns, the first and second languages spoken within households, and mobility. Although the study pre-dates the diversity seen today in Glasgow, it nonetheless provides an interesting snapshot of a period of change amongst Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article
Bowes et al. (1990b) Racism and harassment of Asians in Glasgow Although a study of racism during the late nineteen eighties, Bowes et al (1990b) combine case-study methodology and survey data to provide analysis of both institutional and interpersonal racism as experienced by the Asian community in Glasgow and considers those experiences within a wider Scottish context. With a focus on the policies of the Housing Department of the then Glasgow District Council, the paper begins with a interesting discussion of the use of central terms, which allows the authors to present an explanation for their use of the term ‘racial harassment’ in preference to that of ‘racist harassment’. Overall, the study found a general lack of enforcement rendered anti-racist measures ineffective when it came to addressing institutional racism. See also Bowes et al (1990a) for a study dating from the same period which also considered issues faced by Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities in relation to council housing. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article
Collins (2007) Housing, work and welfare experiences of new migrants in Scotland Focusing on new migrants, this report presents the findings from research which examined Polish migrant workers, who are now the largest new migrant community in Scotland. Input from migrants themselves is the cornerstone of this research. The research also reviews part of the wider Door Step project which falls under an Equal Access programme to aid new migrants and refugees to become specialist advisers in employment, housing and welfare rights. Some of the central findings emerging from the research include concerns expressed by Polish migrant workers over inequality and exploitation which are seen as resulting from Government policy. Overall their experience has been generally positive however, more worryingly, Collins (2007) suggests evidence of increased poverty, poor housing conditions and even homelessness among migrants. Read More Visit site Free EU Scotland Third sector
European Migration Network (2013) Ad-Hoc Query on allocation of refugees to municipalities for integration purposes Intended to facilitate information exchange between EU member states, the European Migration Network (EMN) provides an interesting comparison of policy and practice (See European Migration Network) across EU Member States. Their Ad-Hoc Query on allocation of refugees to municipalities for integration purposes (2013) offers a useful resource for anyone wishing to gain a quick overview of other European regions’ policy on refugee dispersal and housing. Two questions are key to the research. The first question is: Does the member state regulate the dispersal of refugees and other persons that have been granted protection to municipalities once they have received a residence permit? The second question is: Does the member state share the Swedish experience of a general shortage of available housing for newly arrived migrants? Responses from the 23 member states who participated are presented the UK is included as a respondent. See also European Migration Network (2012) for member states responses to questions on linguistic integration. Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK, EU EU Document
Glasgow Housing Association (2008) Housing migrant workers: the impact on GHA From 2004 onwards, Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) has experienced an increase in demand for its homes and housing services from migrant workers. GHA therefore commissioned this study to better understand the needs of its newly arrived population. Migrants’ experiences of GHA housing provision are presented and discussed. The report also seeks to ascertain how GHA and other Local Housing Organisation services have been impacted by immigration. With a specific focus on A8 migrants to Glasgow, the study explores the impact on operational management experienced by these organisations when housing such a diverse group of workers with diverse linguistic and cultural characteristics. Although most A8 migrant workers opt for private rented accommodation, the study found that GHA housing was regarded as a more affordable and secure housing choice, and that such choice plays a key role when it comes to decisions regarding long-term settlement. Read More Visit site Free EU Glasgow City Third sector
Scottish Borders Council (2011) Welcome to the Scottish Borders: A guide to help people who want to live and work in the Scottish Borders This guide is part of an overall strategy by the Scottish Borders Council and their partners to promote an inclusive community. The guide is available in English, Polish, Portuguese and Lithuanian language formats and provides useful information about a range of key public and private services for new arrivals to the area regardless of whether they come to work live or simply visit the Scottish Borders. The contents provide clear and accurate information to assist newcomers to feel welcome within the local community, and cover key aspects such as employment, housing, health and welfare, education, emergency service provision along with general help and advice about living within the community. This resource produced by the Scottish Borders Council reflects the arrival of people to the area from both within and outside the European Union, which has added to the diversity of the Scottish Borders. Read More Visit site Free Public sector