Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Aspinall and Watters (2010) Refugees and asylum seekers: A review from an equality and human rights perspective Aspinall and Watters (2010) provide a comprehensive account of issues faced by refugees and asylum seekers within a number of domains including health, education and employment. The report is particularly relevant within a Scottish context as it outlines the situation found in Scotland as part of a section devoted to geographical differences within the UK. Following a brief outline of Scotland’s response to asylum seekers over past decades through the asylum dispersal programme of the UK Government and Glasgow’s principal participation, the authors provide detail of issues concerning housing; destitution; healthcare; integration of asylum seekers and refugees; children and young people; media and public attitudes, before finally touching on some of the differences found between Scottish and UK government policy. See also Ager and Strang (2010) for a study which focuses on refugee integration; Mulvey (2013); and Threadgold and Court (2005). Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Public sector
Bowes and Domokos (1993) South Asian women and health services: A study in Glasgow Bowes and Domokos (1993) examined the healthcare experience of a selection of Glasgow’s South Asian women (mostly of Punjabi origin). They investigate the women’s own experiences through interviews. The authors also discuss the experiences of the women’s families. A number of issues emerged, such as a necessity for greater translation assistance and a need to challenge discrimination and stereotyping within health service delivery; the study stresses the importance of accessing the unheard voices of this minority group by focusing centrally on their concerns over healthcare. Although the study focused on a specific ethnic minority group and dates from the 1990s, it suggests additional areas for further research and its key finding is significant: rather than cultural barriers it is the healthcare system and occurrence of racism which inhibit full access to healthcare services for South Asian women in Glasgow. Read More Visit site £ TCN Glasgow City Journal article
MacFarlane et al. (2014) Healthcare for migrants, participatory health research and implementation science—better health policy and practice through inclusion. The RESTORE project MacFarlane et al (2014) present details of the RESTORE project which is EU funded and due to be completed in 2015. The project promises increased knowledge of factors that impede the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives designed to make sure healthcare is accessible to migrants - both linguistically and culturally- and suits their needs. The project will also make policy recommendations with a view to overcoming such impediments. The study, which began in 2011, includes input from migrants and key stakeholders within the framework of an overarching comparative project undertaken in Scotland, England, Ireland, Greece, Austria and the Netherlands. This is a timely study within the context provided by the increased global mobility of the current era. The increase in global mobility necessitates a correspondingly culturally competent healthcare system. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
Worth et al. (2009) Vulnerability and access to care for South Asian Sikh and Muslim patients with life limiting illness in Scotland: Prospective longitudinal qualitative study Worth et al. (2009) outline their longitudinal study which attempts to understand the difficulties that Muslim South Asian and Sikh patients suffering from life limiting illnesses encounter when accessing services in Scotland. The study also proposes potential solutions for some of the obstacles identified. The study revealed a number of problematic areas. These included an apparent lack of culturally appropriate care, services constrained by resource issues and incidences of both racial and religious discrimination. Those found to be most vulnerable were more recent arrivals with limited command of English or no family advocate. Notably, the South Asian and Sikh community only has limited awareness of the function of hospices and associated services. Although the study recognises that robust diversity policies are in place in Scotland, Worth et al. (2009) stress the necessity for active case management and a focus on ethnic minority needs. These steps are needed in order to meet the required provision of palliative care for all South Asian Sikh and Muslim patients, providing them with full access to high quality end-of-life care. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Journal article