Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Crawford et al. (2012) Migration and health in Glasgow and its relevance to GoWell This report by Crawford et al. (2012) was produced for the collaborative partnership GoWell (See www.gowellonline.com). With a focus on health and Wellbeing;in Glasgow, the study provides a brief historical background, an examination of the impact of migration through areas such as policy, regeneration, legislation and analysis of migration patterns. It also provides interesting detail of ethnic composition and demographic changes within the boundaries of the GoWell study area. The report reviews findings from survey data which report that migrants declare themselves to be in better health than fellow residents within their local community area. The report helps contextualise the GoWell study findings and provides an insightful account of the impact of previous and current migration patterns, the influence of policy, and the effects of migration on health in Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Public sector
George et al. (2011) Impact of migration on the consumption of education and children’s services and the consumption of health services, social care and social services George et al. (2011) include Scotland in an analysis of UK Immigration Policy focusing on the UK’s Points Based System. Within the limitations set by available data, the study examines the financial costs involved in the provision of education, health and social services for migrants. The study also provides a review of existing literature of the impact on public services that the presence of migrants has. The authors identify the area of service impact as one that has been under-researched. They incorporate a detailed account of associated expenditure stemming from migration and suggest implications for UK immigration policy. See also Dustmann and Frattini (2011) who explore the impact of migration on public service provision, Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) who assess the impact of migration to Scotland since 2004,, a study on housing by Glasgow Housing Association (2008) and, Catto and Gorman (2010) who analyse media presentation of the impact of Central and Eastern European migration on NHS Scotland. Read More Visit site Free UK, Scotland Independent research
Kearns and Whitley (2010) Health, Wellbeing and social inclusion of migrants in North Glasgow Kearns and Whitely (2010) examine the health, Wellbeing and social inclusion of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. The authors make a comparison with other residents, particularly within North Glasgow’s regeneration zones. The authors aim to establish whether or not migrants are worse off than the general population and, to identify any need for additional support. The study is based on interpretation of data from the household survey. The authors interpret the data with caution, pointing out that migrant respondents could have a different understanding of the questions being asked or may have been cautious in giving their response. The study finds that although migrants appear to be generally healthy in comparison to other groups surveyed, there is evidence which points to poor social cohesion and harassment is a relatively common experience. What is more, refugees expressed greater concern over their personal safety, while the issue of social isolation were also a cause for anxiety for those seeking asylum. Read More Visit site Free Refugee, Asylum, TCN, EU Glasgow City Public sector
Love et al. (2007) Health and ethnicity in Aberdeenshire: a study of Polish in-migrants This report recognises the specific health needs of migrants who have arrived in Scotland and clearly places migration within the domain of public health. This report focuses on the situation regarding Polish migrants to Aberdeenshire and NHS Grampian region. With health issues for migrants stemming from increased vulnerability, the report discusses some of the existing policies that have been put in place regionally in order to mitigate these issues. These policies have included provision of interpretation services for improved communication, additional training along with active promotion of healthcare within migrant communities. Also see a study on stress among Polish migrant workers in Scotland by Weishaar (2008) and Weishaar (2010) which provides further examples of the difficulties faced by Polish economic migrants trying to cope with the consequences of their migration. Also see MacFarlane et al (2014) for a report on factors that impede the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives designed to make sure healthcare is accessible and suitable for migrant needs. Read More Visit site Free EU Aberdeenshire Public sector
Scottish Borders Council (2011) Welcome to the Scottish Borders: A guide to help people who want to live and work in the Scottish Borders This guide is part of an overall strategy by the Scottish Borders Council and their partners to promote an inclusive community. The guide is available in English, Polish, Portuguese and Lithuanian language formats and provides useful information about a range of key public and private services for new arrivals to the area regardless of whether they come to work live or simply visit the Scottish Borders. The contents provide clear and accurate information to assist newcomers to feel welcome within the local community, and cover key aspects such as employment, housing, health and welfare, education, emergency service provision along with general help and advice about living within the community. This resource produced by the Scottish Borders Council reflects the arrival of people to the area from both within and outside the European Union, which has added to the diversity of the Scottish Borders. Read More Visit site Free Public sector
Weishaar (2008) Consequences of international migration: A qualitative study on stress among Polish migrant workers in Scotland Weishaar (2008) produces a study which highlights the specific health service needs of Polish migrants to Scotland. To a great degree, Polish migrants access the health service for treatment for complaints resulting from the strain caused by adjustments necessarily made over the course of transition from one country (and culture) to another. These processes increase levels of migrant stress and vulnerability. Weishaar (2008) utilises data gathered from focus groups and interviews to show that some of the stress Polish migrants face is caused by attempts to cope with a new environment. This strain is exacerbated by cultural and communication difficulties. See also the study by Weishaar (2010) which provides further examples of the difficulties faced by Polish economic migrants to Edinburgh trying to cope with migration. A report by Love et al. (2007) examines the specific health needs of Polish migrants in Aberdeenshire and NHS Grampian region. Read More Visit site £ EU Scotland Journal article
Weishaar (2010) “You have to be flexible”—Coping among polish migrant workers in Scotland In this study Weishaar (2010) builds on earlier work (See Weishaar 2008) to provide further examples of the difficulties Polish economic migrants face when trying to cope with migration. With a focus on Edinburgh, Weishaar (2010) provides a detailed account of the successful strategies Poles employ to offset the strain of migration. The study is based on focus groups and interview data. Findings reveal that respondents are resourceful and resilient and that social support needs to be an integral part of the adjustment process. The findings discussed in this study have implications for any host country with considerable migrant populations. A better understanding of the relationship between coping with migration and health, coupled with more targeted support, may have considerable benefits for public health. Also see the report by Love et al. (2007) on the specific health needs of Polish migrants in Aberdeenshire and NHS Grampian region. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh Journal article