Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

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Hickman, Crowley, Mai (2008), Immigration and social cohesion in the UK The rhythms and realities of everyday life This research set out to improve our understanding of the relationship between new immigration and social cohesion by exploring the rhythms and realities of everyday life of both the long-term settled and new arrival residents. The research is based on the premise that everyday realities in the UK are under pressure from the forces of individualisation, globalisation and post-industrialism, which structure the lives of the long-term settled and new immigrants alike. We aimed to investigate the strategies people deployed, in a time of far-reaching changes, to meet their perceived priorities and needs. In current public debates, there is an association made between increasing ethnic and religious diversity and the erosion of social cohesion. However, recent research has shown that age, class and where we live are far more important in shaping life chances than are ethnicity or religion and that the arrival of new migrant groups did not coincide with an increase in crime. We explored the relations between and within long-term resident and new arrival groups and the impact of social and economic transformations in six sites across the UK: • England:Leicester; • England: London, Downham; • England: London, Kilburn; • England: Peterborough and Thetford; • Northern Ireland: Dungannon; • Scotland:Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free UK Research Report
Kearns and Whitley (2015) Getting There? The Effects of Functional Factors, Time and Place on the Social Integration of Migrants A survey of 1400 migrants, including many asylum seekers and refugees, living in deprived areas in Glasgow, UK is used to test hypotheses in the literature about the effects of functional factors (educational qualifications, ability to speak English, employment), time and place upon the social integration of migrants. Three aspects are considered: trust, reliance and safety; social relations; sense of community. Overall, social integration indicators were worse for migrants than for British citizens living in the same places. Functional factors were positively associated with different aspects of social integration: higher education with more neighbourly behaviours; employment with better social relations and belonging; and English language with greater reliance on others and available social support. Time was positively associated with most social integration indicators; time in the local area more so than time in the UK. Living in a regeneration area was negatively associated with many aspects of social integration. The findings raise questions about the doubly negative effects of the use of dispersal policy for asylum seekers to regeneration areas, necessitating secondary relocation of migrants through further, forced onward migration. Read More Visit site £ UK, Glasgow, Scotland Article