Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Flint (2007) Faith schools, multiculturalism and community cohesion: Muslim and Roman Catholic state schools in England and Scotland Flint (2007) within a comparative examination of the development of Scotland’s Roman Catholic state schools and the emergence of England’s more recent Muslim state school sector, demonstrates that discourse associated with such faith schools replicates the tension found within conceptions of national identity, cohesion and citizenship. The author asserts that management of broader forms of diversity and the appreciation of existing inequality between religious and ethnic groups in asserting their rights and legitimacy is necessary first to foster community cohesion through education policy. The study underlines the right of minority ethnic groups to a faith-based education as part of their citizenship, which is supported by supranational legislation and highlights issues such as the tension between staff recruitment policy and such legislation. Overall, Flint (2007) provides a valuable contribution to the contemporary debate surrounding not only state provision of faith schools, but also the debate over community cohesion and citizenship. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, England Journal article
Snyder (2011) Un/settling Angels: Faith-based organizations and asylum-seeking in the UK Snyder (2011) investigates the rationale behind Church support for people seeking asylum in Scotland. The author also discusses the challenges and impediments such faith-based organisations face when attempting to provide such support. The study centres on three key aspects of religious organisations’ activities in relation to their work with asylum seekers. These are transcendent motivation, organisation and strategies and mobilisation of resources. The study reviews the aspects of support the Church provides to aid settlement. Pastoral care, worship and advocacy aimed to help new arrivals settle are discussed in addition to church-led efforts designed to question negative attitudes, raise awareness and influence Government policy. By exploring how churches work with people seeking asylum, the study contributes to the under-researched area of the role played by faith-based organisations in supporting new arrivals to the UK. The research demonstrates the strong contribution churches make to the provision of support for asylum seekers. The author proposes that more work needs to be done to explore non-Christian engagement in this area. Read More Visit site £ Asylum seeker, Refugee UK Journal article