Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Bailey et al. (1994) The Chinese community in Scotland Although conducted over two decades ago, Bailey et al (1994) provide analysis of Scotland’s Chinese community, focusing on their economic and employment characteristics; housing and household structure; and analysis of urban settlement patterns. Drawing upon the 1991 Scottish census data, the authors also provide a brief but interesting historical background to Chinese migration to the UK and later arrival to Scotland. There is also a discussion of the debate over whether or not the Chinese can be said to constitute a community. Based upon the study’s findings, the authors reflect upon policy considerations which could best meet the needs of Scotland’s Chinese population in a culturally sensitive manner. The study was – and still is - viewed very much as a starting point in terms of researching this community. It highlights the presence in Scotland of a significantly under researched and distinct ethnic minority. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Bailey et al. (1995) Pakistanis in Scotland: Census data and research issues Bailey et al (1995) highlight the significant place of the Pakistani community in Scotland as a distinct population group, particularly in terms of demographics, housing and career/occupation compared to Scotland’s wider population. Drawing upon 1991 Census data, the study examines the household composition and economic position of Scotland’s Pakistanis in addition to shedding light on their pattern of settlement across Scotland. The authors find distinct patterns emerge from the data which suggest a notable contrast with those of the general Scottish population. Although dating from 1995, the authors’ inclusion of a historical background the study provides a useful insight into one of Scotland’s important ethnic minority communities. For more on Scotland’s Pakistani community, see an earlier study by Bowes et al. (1990a) and a subsequent study by Saeed et al. (1999) which focuses on issues of identity among Glasgow’s Pakistani teenagers. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Bowes et al. (1990a) The changing nature of Glasgow's ethnic‐minority community Bowes et al (1990a) chart the changes exhibited by ethnic minority groups in Glasgow (mainly within the context of council housing). The discussion is based on data gathered as part of an earlier local authority funded study. The paper incorporated data from the electoral register, which although limited in some respects, was nonetheless the best data available on household composition. The data are complemented by a household survey undertaken by the authors. The analysis shows the average ethnic minority household size as notably greater than the overall Glasgow average. In addition, the paper discusses ethnic minority employment patterns, the first and second languages spoken within households, and mobility. Although the study pre-dates the diversity seen today in Glasgow, it nonetheless provides an interesting snapshot of a period of change amongst Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article
Hopkins (2007b) Global events, national politics, local lives: young Muslim men in Scotland Hopkins’ (2007b) study challenges the notion that Scotland’s youth are disengaged from mainstream politics. In so doing, it highlights the specific experiences of young Muslim men living within Scotland’s urban areas, placing their lives within a global context which takes events post 9/11 into account. One of the particular strengths of this study is the emphasis placed on the views of young Muslim men, which gives them a principal voice in the analysis. This study builds effectively on some of the authors’ earlier work, see for example Hopkins (2004) which examines the complex issue of national identity for young Scottish Muslim men in our post 9/11 era, Hopkins (2007a) for a study on the importance of global connections to young Scottish Muslim men and Hopkins (2009) for a study focussing on the experience of young Muslim men in Edinburgh and Glasgow within the context of debates around masculinity. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Journal article
McMillan (2008) Changing identities: Intercultural dimensions in Scottish educational contexts McMillan (2008) highlights the potential problem face by some bilingual ethnic minority learners upon commencing higher education. Challenges originate from learners’ level of English acquisition during their prior education. The author finds that for some students, the consequences of their past experience of English language learning impacts negatively on their ability to acquire academic literacies at university level. This, in turn, may explain a tendency to superficial approaches to learning. The study found that academic writing and reading comprehension was self identified by students as an area of weakness, while on the other hand, respondents were more able to express their knowledge and understanding orally. The study suggests that failure to fully meet and support these learners’ needs throughout their education may negatively impact their ability to fulfil their academic potential. The study therefore carries implications for both mainstream and university practice. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Academic journal