Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Danson and Jentsch (2012) International migration and economic participation in small towns and rural areas—cross-national evidence Danson and Jentsch (2012) include Scotland (case study of the Outer Hebrides) in their cross-national comparative study of international migration to rural areas (together with the USA, Canada and Ireland). This approach allows them to discuss key themes within a comparative context. The study focuses on migrant experiences related to underemployment, pay and working conditions along with the important influence of welcoming communities for migrant settlement experience. Although chiefly cross-national in scope, the study nonetheless shows that in Scotland’s case, communities are more receptive to migrants in areas which have previously experienced sustained out-migration. In both rural and urban areas migrant workers are viewed as integral to sustaining some businesses. In turn, this means that migrant workers enjoy high rates of employment – albeit physically demanding work characterised by long or unsociable hours and low pay. The study draws attention to a continuing feature within Scotland; poor matching of migrants’ skills and qualifications with appropriate levels of employment. See also Danson and Jentsch (2009) which examines processes of inclusion and exclusion within the rural Scottish labour market. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, USA, Canada, Ireland Journal article
Guillemot and Shubin (2010) Searching jobs for 'better life': Understanding employment mobility and well-being of Eastern European migrants in France and Scotland Guillemot and Shubin (2010) explore both the theoretical and practical issues connected to the employment and well-being of Eastern European migrants in France (Anjou) and Scotland (Aberdeenshire) and questions related concepts and policies on migration and integration. The article covers emerging mobile lifestyles and the subsequent need for social policy to correspondingly adapt and highlights the potential barrier created by EU policies intended to limit migration through focusing on illegal labour and favouring seasonal or highly skilled labour. The authors anticipate that while the possibility of a reduction in the demand for migrant labour and lower employment opportunities emanating from economic instability, may also elicit an increase in xenophobia as witnessed during the 2010 French regional elections. For further studies on Eastern European migrant mobility see Shubin (2012a; 2012b) which consider the influence of faith and the church in the experiences of Eastern European migrant integration; and Shubin and Dickey (2013) who explore the interplay between migrant mobility and employment of Eastern European workers across Scotland. Read More Visit site Free EU Aberdeenshire Academic research
Irwin, McAreavey and Murphy, The Economic and Social Mobility of Ethnic Minority Communities in Northern Ireland This research examines poverty across the different ethnic minority groups in Northern Ireland, following a period of unprecedented inward migration. The report aims to address significant gaps in knowledge and data on employment patterns and experiences of ethnic minority communities. It found that: The worst outcomes relating to economic activity, labour market participation, education and health were among the Irish Traveller community; Ability in spoken English is perceived as a key factor in supporting promotion and progression in the labour market; and Focus groups with individuals of various ethnic minority backgrounds highlighted a perception that ‘ethnic markers’, along with unfamiliarity with formal recruitment practices and a lack of networks, played a significant role in restricting access to the labour market. Ethnic minorities were at particular risk of in-work poverty. Read More Visit site Free Northern Ireland Research Report
Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) Recent Migration into Scotland: The Evidence Base This National Institute of Economic and Social Research publication authored by Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) reviews evidence from a wide range of sources (published and unpublished, qualitative and quantitative) to assess the impact of migration to Scotland since 2004. In addition to assessing the impact of A8 migrants, the report also considers the impact of the arrival of refugee and asylum seekers. The authors assess the impact of these immigration flows in economic, employment and social spheres. The report finds that the statistical data that is available is rather limited. In addition, the authors identify a number of gaps where information needs to be improved. Additional research is particularly needed in the domains of health, education, crime, children and social care. In order to effectively inform policy, more information is required on barriers to accessing employment, migrant access to services and the catalysts and barriers to community integration. The study reflects the fact that migration does increase demand for public services but it also acknowledges migration’s central role in the Scottish Government’s economic strategy. Read More Visit site Free A8, Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Scottish Government
Scottish Borders Council (2011) Welcome to the Scottish Borders: A guide to help people who want to live and work in the Scottish Borders This guide is part of an overall strategy by the Scottish Borders Council and their partners to promote an inclusive community. The guide is available in English, Polish, Portuguese and Lithuanian language formats and provides useful information about a range of key public and private services for new arrivals to the area regardless of whether they come to work live or simply visit the Scottish Borders. The contents provide clear and accurate information to assist newcomers to feel welcome within the local community, and cover key aspects such as employment, housing, health and welfare, education, emergency service provision along with general help and advice about living within the community. This resource produced by the Scottish Borders Council reflects the arrival of people to the area from both within and outside the European Union, which has added to the diversity of the Scottish Borders. Read More Visit site Free Public sector
Stewart (2005) Employment and integration of refugee doctors in Scotland This study is part of a wider body of work undertaken by the Global Commission on International Migration (GCIM) launched by the UN Secretary-General. This approach has been taken in recognition of the importance of migration to the international community. The resulting reports published as part of the Global Migration Perspectives collection are intended as a contribution to discourse on international migration. This report by Stewart (2005) examines the integration of refugees and asylum seekers from a Scottish perspective. The study examines the issue of integration using the employment of refugee doctors as a case study. The study reviews Glasgow’s position in the context of the UK’s asylum dispersal policy, highlighting the structural impediments that may impact on employment. The research also notes that integration is a process that draws unique individual and institutional factors together. This collaborative research project - conducted in Glasgow - exposes the challenges to integration which stem from UK legislative frameworks, most notably the policy of precluding asylum seekers from employment. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Independent research