Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
A guide for refugee parents about schools and learning in Scotland Answers to frequently asked questions about school education in Scotland. Useful websites for refugee parents in Scotland. Read More Visit site Scotland Education Scotland document
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Aspinwall (2013) The Catholic Minority Experience in Scotland: the Poorhouse View, 1850–1914 For an insight into past experience of integration into Scottish life, this paper by Aspinwall provides an insightful account of how the mass identity of Scotland’s Catholics aligned with the Roman Catholic church, as a group only advanced within Scottish society following political, social and educational changes. Such changes, most notably in voting rights, education, and the emergence of the Labour Party, coincided with a demise in church hierarchy. Until this time, the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland had galvanised a poorly educated and low skilled flock into a coherent community in the midst of poverty and deprivation. This had been achieved through building social bonds and morality by way of a conservative brand of religion, set against a backdrop of prejudice. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
British Red Cross (2010) Positive Images Toolkit The British Red Cross Positive Images Toolkit provides an excellent resource for helping young people aged 12 or over to gain a better understanding of issues related to migration and development (in line with the Millennium Development Goals). The toolkit is designed to empower young people to take steps to address migrant vulnerability. It includes a wide range of practical and interactive ways of engaging young people, complete with lesson plans to aid delivery. Read More Visit site Free UK Third sector
Candappa et al. (2007) Education and schooling for asylum-seeking and refugee students in Scotland: an exploratory study Candappa et al’s (2007) is a Scottish Executive Schools Directorate commissioned study which investigates the provision of education for refugee and asylum seeking pupils in Scotland. Exploring a range of related issues, the study’s principle aim was to identify best practice for integrating these pupils into the Scottish education system, based on the authors’ examination of existing provision. The study also takes account of policy and practice within two local authorities in England. The Scottish based research with chosen primary and secondary schools, was conducted in two Scottish cities (which remain anonymous in the report) and included interviews with senior staff, children and parents, in addition to a survey conducted with Scottish Education Authorities. Overall, this study highlights the numerous factors which affect refugee and asylum seeking children’s well-being, and ultimately underlines that all children in Scotland have entitlement to a full education. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland, England Scottish Government document
Dillon, S (2013) The Impact of Migrant Children in Glasgow Schools Dillon (2013) examines educational attainment within two publicly funded Glasgow secondary schools with contrasting experience of migrant pupils. The research focused on migrant children who do not have English as their first language and compared them to locally born children with English as their first language. The study also includes accounts from teaching staff located across the city with experience of teaching classes comprised of migrant and native children. Overall, analysis of both schools showed that while it cannot be said that migrants had improved attainment, there is also no evidence of migrants having impacted negatively on either school’s overall attainment figures. Moreover, migrant children were found to enhance classroom discussion providing a different worldview for their peers and some mainstream teachers. This suggests that their presence has a positive impact. The research was conducted as part of a collaborative master’s project at the University of Glasgow involving COSLA Strategic Migration Partnership and Glasgow City Council’s English as an Additional Language (EAL) Service in association with Glasgow Refugee, Asylum and Migration Network (GRAMNet). See also Foley (2013) for a look at EAL policy and practice. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Independent research
George et al. (2011) Impact of migration on the consumption of education and children’s services and the consumption of health services, social care and social services George et al. (2011) include Scotland in an analysis of UK Immigration Policy focusing on the UK’s Points Based System. Within the limitations set by available data, the study examines the financial costs involved in the provision of education, health and social services for migrants. The study also provides a review of existing literature of the impact on public services that the presence of migrants has. The authors identify the area of service impact as one that has been under-researched. They incorporate a detailed account of associated expenditure stemming from migration and suggest implications for UK immigration policy. See also Dustmann and Frattini (2011) who explore the impact of migration on public service provision, Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) who assess the impact of migration to Scotland since 2004,, a study on housing by Glasgow Housing Association (2008) and, Catto and Gorman (2010) who analyse media presentation of the impact of Central and Eastern European migration on NHS Scotland. Read More Visit site Free UK, Scotland Independent research
HMIe (2009) Count us in: Meeting the needs of children and young people newly arrived in Scotland This report by HM Inspectorate of Education is primarily intended for teaching staff and support workers involved in pre-school centres, primary and secondary schools. The report would also be of interest however to a wide range of parties interested in supporting migrant children and their families such as community learning and development staff, English as an additional language and bilingual support services staff, youth workers, voluntary organisations, and community and faith groups. The report discusses the practices Scottish schools have adopted to provide support for newly arrived migrant children and their families – this includes examples of measures introduced by school staff to help new arrivals feel welcome, increase their confidence and fulfil their potential. In addition, the report also highlights areas where Scottish schools and education authorities could improve their provision of learning and support for all learners. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Scottish Government

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