Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Deakins et al. (2009) Minority ethnic enterprise in Scotland Focusing on ethnic minority businesses, Deakins et al (2009) present a Scotland-wide study which analyses both interviews and statistical data and highlights the diversity of entrepreneurial experiences found across Scotland (both geographically and between business sectors). The study uncovers some of the coping strategies and innovation used by minority businesses with particular reference to attempts at diversification into new markets. Issues including racism, crime and security were found to be significant factors in determining the success of the diversification. The study calls for policy and policy implementation to improve communication and promote diversity, which the authors contend provides an important platform for business creativity and innovation. See also Deakins et al. (1997) who demonstrate that marketing strategies and networks are integral to the success of small ethic minority business and Deakins et al. (2007) a study that uncovers the complexity and relevance of social capital for ethnic minority business. For a study of Polish entrepreneurs in Scotland see Lassalle et al. (2011). Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) ‘We're still human beings, we're not aliens’: promoting the citizenship rights and cultural diversity of Traveller children in schools: Scottish and English perspectives Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) draw attention to the difficulties faced by Traveller children (including experiences of prejudice and incidences of racism), crucially the authors then explore how their marginalisation can be addressed through full inclusion within the school environment. Scottish and English case studies are used within their analysis. This is achieved by analysing Traveller children’s own accounts of the experience of attending school and includes children’s perceptions of their teachers’ views of them. The authors find that Traveller children are far from considered equal in terms of citizenship within the school environment and in effect retain ‘outsider’ status. See also Shubin (2011) which examines how Scottish Travellers itinerant lifestyle impacts on their access to - and participation in- Scottish society, Bromley et al. (2007) which reports on Scottish attitudes to discrimination, finds a prevalence of prejudice towards Traveller/Gypsy communities and, de Lima et al. (2011) which includes consideration of Traveller ethnicity within a study of ethnicity and poverty. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, England Journal article
Hickman, Crowley, Mai (2008), Immigration and social cohesion in the UK The rhythms and realities of everyday life This research set out to improve our understanding of the relationship between new immigration and social cohesion by exploring the rhythms and realities of everyday life of both the long-term settled and new arrival residents. The research is based on the premise that everyday realities in the UK are under pressure from the forces of individualisation, globalisation and post-industrialism, which structure the lives of the long-term settled and new immigrants alike. We aimed to investigate the strategies people deployed, in a time of far-reaching changes, to meet their perceived priorities and needs. In current public debates, there is an association made between increasing ethnic and religious diversity and the erosion of social cohesion. However, recent research has shown that age, class and where we live are far more important in shaping life chances than are ethnicity or religion and that the arrival of new migrant groups did not coincide with an increase in crime. We explored the relations between and within long-term resident and new arrival groups and the impact of social and economic transformations in six sites across the UK: • England:Leicester; • England: London, Downham; • England: London, Kilburn; • England: Peterborough and Thetford; • Northern Ireland: Dungannon; • Scotland:Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free UK Research Report
Hopkins (2008) Race, nation and politics: the difference that Scotland makes Hopkins (2008) draws attention to the distinct differences found in Scotland on matters of race and racism and contrasts these with the views held elsewhere in the United Kingdom. In a review of past research, the author firstly outlines the similarities that can be found within both the Scottish and UK contexts prior to highlighting differences that are evident. One of the key differences found is that of diversity. Scotland is home to far less diversity and distribution within the Black and ethnic minority population than England which differs both in population size and composition. Scotland’s brand of civic nationalism also differs from types of nationalism found elsewhere in the UK. This variance is evidenced by Asian electoral support for the Scottish National Party. Most notably, the author makes the point that although immigration is a reserved issue for which Westminster retains responsibility, the distinct differences found within Scotland’s legal, education, health and social work systems may play a key role in how matters of equality and diversity are experienced within Scottish society. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Book
McKenna (2006) Equality in Moray: Research into equalities policy and practice This study explores issues of policy and practice related to gender, disability and race equalities within Moray. It provides a considerable amount of detail on access to employment and the service needs of Moray’s established minority ethnic communities and new migrants. The study analyses findings within the context of regional racial equality policy objectives. The analysis examines reported incidents of racism, consultations with minority ethnic communities, interviews with migrant workers and a public survey conducted via the Moray Citizens Panel. The report underlines the increasing diversity of Moray’s population, identifying new migrant communities such as Polish, Portuguese and the particular Russian language translation needs of Latvian Russian speakers. Part of the research process involved reaching out to the local Chinese community, which as Moray’s largest established minority, had not previously been involved in any community planning process. Read More Visit site Free Moray Public sector