Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

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Flint (2007) Faith schools, multiculturalism and community cohesion: Muslim and Roman Catholic state schools in England and Scotland Flint (2007) within a comparative examination of the development of Scotland’s Roman Catholic state schools and the emergence of England’s more recent Muslim state school sector, demonstrates that discourse associated with such faith schools replicates the tension found within conceptions of national identity, cohesion and citizenship. The author asserts that management of broader forms of diversity and the appreciation of existing inequality between religious and ethnic groups in asserting their rights and legitimacy is necessary first to foster community cohesion through education policy. The study underlines the right of minority ethnic groups to a faith-based education as part of their citizenship, which is supported by supranational legislation and highlights issues such as the tension between staff recruitment policy and such legislation. Overall, Flint (2007) provides a valuable contribution to the contemporary debate surrounding not only state provision of faith schools, but also the debate over community cohesion and citizenship. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, England Journal article
Saggar et al. (2012) The impacts of migration on social cohesion and integration The Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) was established in 2007 to advise the UK government on issues relating to migration. Saggar et al. (2012) present their report to MAC which included an assessment of the impacts of migration on social cohesion and integration. The authors observe that defining the concepts of ‘social cohesion’ and ‘integration’ is an important step in order to make effective analytical use of such elusive ideas. A considerable effort is made to provide the reader with detailed conceptual frameworks for consideration. Cohesion is examined in terms of how migration affects local neighbourhoods. Integration is measured with reference to a range of social and economic areas. The impact that migration has on the host country is also considered in terms of the consequences migration has for British national identity. The authors find that there was no significant impact on cohesion stemming from new immigration; the report advocates that cohesion and integration policy development should focus on issues related to deprivation rather than on migration per-se. Read More Visit site Free UK Government document