Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Ager and Strang (2004) Indicators of Integration: Final Report Commissioned by the Home Office, this report by Ager and Strang (2004) outlines their proposed Indicators of Integration framework as a useful tool for both policy makers and anyone involved in refugee integration. Central to their framework is the conceptual division of integration into separate but interconnected categories (domains) within which suggested indicators which allow a practical way for integration progress to be measured are contained. As well as providing an overview of how the framework was developed, the report provides a clear explanation of the framework and its structure, and includes suggestions on how it could be utilised. Through the authors’ consideration of the variety found within conceptions of integration, Ager and Strang (2004) bring the study of refugee integration a step closer to developing a consistent and universal understanding within a UK context. See also subsequent work on integration by the same authors; Ager and Strang (2008); Ager and Strang (2010). Read More Visit site Free Refugee UK UK Government document
Ager and Strang (2008) Understanding Integration: A Conceptual Framework Widely held as a seminal work, Ager and Strang present their framework as a tool for those seeking a better understanding of integration, the study has contributed greatly to subsequent debate. The authors base their work on the current salience of migration and refugee resettlement, both within the realm of public debate and policy objectives, which are found by the authors to be jeopardised by contested definitions. From this base, Ager and Strang conduct their study amidst a contextual consideration of perceptions of what successful integration actually comprises. Thus, a framework is constructed encompassing central spheres and associated themes for examining and measuring access and achievement of migrants and refugees within education; employment; health and housing sectors; rights and citizenship; community and social connections; and associated structural and cultural barriers (See also additional work on integration by the same authors: Ager and Strang 2004; Ager and Strang 2010). Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Ager and Strang (2010) Refugee Integration: Emerging Trends and Remaining Agendas This study builds upon earlier work (See Ager and Strang 2004; and 2008) whereby the authors proposed a conceptual framework for analysis of refugee integration. In this paper, Ager and Strang (2010) employ their conceptual framework and demonstrate its utility in formulating coherent discussion amongst interested parties (whether academic, policy maker or practitioner). The authors provide an interesting discussion of what they identify as key issues; primarily how the social space inhabited by refugees is affected by established notions of nationhood and citizenship; how the idea of social capital is used in relation to social connections, trust and mutual benefit and, they propose a way forward amidst an array of social meaning and identities by expanding the concept of integration as a two way process. Finally they consider the relationship between integration trajectories as charted by their framework, and the concept of resource acquisition spirals. Read More Visit site £ Refugee UK Journal article
Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) ‘We're still human beings, we're not aliens’: promoting the citizenship rights and cultural diversity of Traveller children in schools: Scottish and English perspectives Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) draw attention to the difficulties faced by Traveller children (including experiences of prejudice and incidences of racism), crucially the authors then explore how their marginalisation can be addressed through full inclusion within the school environment. Scottish and English case studies are used within their analysis. This is achieved by analysing Traveller children’s own accounts of the experience of attending school and includes children’s perceptions of their teachers’ views of them. The authors find that Traveller children are far from considered equal in terms of citizenship within the school environment and in effect retain ‘outsider’ status. See also Shubin (2011) which examines how Scottish Travellers itinerant lifestyle impacts on their access to - and participation in- Scottish society, Bromley et al. (2007) which reports on Scottish attitudes to discrimination, finds a prevalence of prejudice towards Traveller/Gypsy communities and, de Lima et al. (2011) which includes consideration of Traveller ethnicity within a study of ethnicity and poverty. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, England Journal article
ESOLScotland.com The ESOLScotland website provides information for learners and practitioners of English for Speakers of Other Languages. It provides information on: - ESOL Courses - Citizenship - Support for learners - Initial assessment guide - Teaching resources - Curriculum Framework - Professional Development for practitioners - Useful weblinks for learners and teachers Read More Visit site Scotland website
Flint (2007) Faith schools, multiculturalism and community cohesion: Muslim and Roman Catholic state schools in England and Scotland Flint (2007) within a comparative examination of the development of Scotland’s Roman Catholic state schools and the emergence of England’s more recent Muslim state school sector, demonstrates that discourse associated with such faith schools replicates the tension found within conceptions of national identity, cohesion and citizenship. The author asserts that management of broader forms of diversity and the appreciation of existing inequality between religious and ethnic groups in asserting their rights and legitimacy is necessary first to foster community cohesion through education policy. The study underlines the right of minority ethnic groups to a faith-based education as part of their citizenship, which is supported by supranational legislation and highlights issues such as the tension between staff recruitment policy and such legislation. Overall, Flint (2007) provides a valuable contribution to the contemporary debate surrounding not only state provision of faith schools, but also the debate over community cohesion and citizenship. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, England Journal article
Goodman (2012) Fortifying Citizenship: Policy strategies for civic integration in Western Europe Goodman (2012) provides an in-depth comparative account of civic integration policy found in Western European states. Although not Scotland specific, the UK is compared with Denmark and Germany using a comparative case study approach. The case study is preceded by a more general overview of integration policy found across Europe. The study touches on the inclusive-exclusive nature of contrasting liberal and constrictive citizenship policies. The study highlights the differing strategies employed by states and the political pressures that shape citizenship policy. See also Beadle and Silverman (2007) which examines the introduction of the UK citizenship test on provision of English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in Scotland and two examples of UK policy in a European comparative context – European Migration Network (2012) on linguistic integration and Migration Network (2013) on allocation of refugees to municipalities. Read More Visit site £ UK, Denmark, Germany Journal article
Hepburn (2011) ‘Citizens of the region’: Party conceptions of regional citizenship and immigrant integration Locating Scotland within studies of Catalonia and Quebec, Hepburn (2011) comparatively explores questions of regional citizenship in relation to immigration and decentralised power within states. In terms of Scotland, the author outlines the Scottish Government and Scottish National Party response to the constraints on immigration policy emanating from a policy area reserved for Westminster, intended to overcome demographic instability and the subsequent concessions made by the UK Government. Covering aspects of citizenship such as rights, participation, and membership (in terms of sense of belonging and identity) the author identifies a number of specific factors, including evidence of political consensus on immigration and a notable absence of far right political parties opposed to immigration in Scotland, alongside Scottish National Party promotion of an open, civic model of citizenship for migrants within an independent Scotland. In this study of an important aspect of migrant integration, Hepburn (2011) highlights the regional differences found in relation to citizenship and its reconfiguration at the sub state level and of citizenship as being inherently linked to immigration policy. Read More Visit site £ Scotland, Catalonia Journal article
Mulvey (2017) Social citizenship, social policy and refugee integration: a case of policy divergence in Scotland. The relationship between Holyrood and Westminster is an evolving one where there is some evidence of policy divergence. Underpinning policy approaches are different views of social citizenship, with the Holyrood approach maintaining elements of the post-1945 welfare settlement. The place of refugees and asylum seekers within these differing approaches is currently underexplored. This article looks at the Scottish and UK Governments’ views of social rights and how they apply to asylum seekers and refugees. It suggests that despite refugee ‘policy’ being at least partly reserved, the Scottish Government has been able to take a different approach from that of Westminster, an approach underpinned by these differing welfare outlooks. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Academic journal
Papageorgiou (2006) Learning beyond words. The impact of second language adult education on migrants' social involvement: A comparison between Scotland and Greece This study by Papageorgiou (2006) incorporates an interesting examination of adult education for migrants in Athens within a comparative framework alongside the example of Glasgow, with both cities having experienced similar demographic change. With the inclusion of opinions from both learners and tutors, the work focuses on how second language classes can be a catalyst for migrants social engagement. Furthermore, the study also explores how the educational experience of migrant learners is impacted on by both socio-political factors and educational practices. The author demonstrates that the level of social participation of second language migrant learners is in the main attributable to tutors use of informal teaching methodology and a broadening of the curriculum with inclusion of extra-curricular activities, in addition to uncovering how tutors perceive their role and the practices they employ are firmly influenced by established educational cultures. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Doctoral thesis

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