Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Bailey et al. (1994) The Chinese community in Scotland Although conducted over two decades ago, Bailey et al (1994) provide analysis of Scotland’s Chinese community, focusing on their economic and employment characteristics; housing and household structure; and analysis of urban settlement patterns. Drawing upon the 1991 Scottish census data, the authors also provide a brief but interesting historical background to Chinese migration to the UK and later arrival to Scotland. There is also a discussion of the debate over whether or not the Chinese can be said to constitute a community. Based upon the study’s findings, the authors reflect upon policy considerations which could best meet the needs of Scotland’s Chinese population in a culturally sensitive manner. The study was – and still is - viewed very much as a starting point in terms of researching this community. It highlights the presence in Scotland of a significantly under researched and distinct ethnic minority. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Bailey et al. (1995) Pakistanis in Scotland: Census data and research issues Bailey et al (1995) highlight the significant place of the Pakistani community in Scotland as a distinct population group, particularly in terms of demographics, housing and career/occupation compared to Scotland’s wider population. Drawing upon 1991 Census data, the study examines the household composition and economic position of Scotland’s Pakistanis in addition to shedding light on their pattern of settlement across Scotland. The authors find distinct patterns emerge from the data which suggest a notable contrast with those of the general Scottish population. Although dating from 1995, the authors’ inclusion of a historical background the study provides a useful insight into one of Scotland’s important ethnic minority communities. For more on Scotland’s Pakistani community, see an earlier study by Bowes et al. (1990a) and a subsequent study by Saeed et al. (1999) which focuses on issues of identity among Glasgow’s Pakistani teenagers. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Characteristics of recent and established EEA and non-EEA migrants in Scotland: Analysis of the 2011 Census This publication contains analysis of the 2011 Census data on the characteristics of migrants, i.e. Scottish residents with a country of birth outside the UK. Findings are presented for recent EEA, recent non-EEA, established EEA and established non-EEA migrant groups. EEA countries included EU member countries (excluding the UK) and Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein. The non-EEA category included all other countries of birth, including Croatia which was not a EU member at the time of the 2011 Census. The report further distinguishes those migrants who have arrived in the UK 10 years or longer ago (‘established’) and those migrants who arrived in the 10 years prior to the 2011 Census (‘recent’). The topics covered include origin and length of residence; personal and household characteristics, including language; geographic area and accommodation; education and employment; and health. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Scottish Government document
Statistical profile of migrants from outside the European Economic Area (EEA) using data from Scotland’s Census 2011 The purpose of the Migration Matters Scotland project was to understand the needs of migrant populations in Scotland and assist public bodies plan and provide support services in line with migrant needs. National Records of Scotland had responsibility for undertaking Scotland’s Census 2011 and became involved in the Migration Matters Scotland project to: - assist public bodies to utilise fully the census data available. - provide additional data on the key groups of interest that had not previously been published. The Migration Matters Scotland project had a particular emphasis on non-EU migrants and the purpose of this report was to provide Scotland’s Census 2011 statistics on this migrant group as they were not part of the standard outputs. National Records of Scotland became involved in the project in order to provide appropriate data and offer some guidance on how census data can best be used. Read More Visit site Free TCN Scotland Scottish Government document