Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Cowen et al. (2011) Sanctuary, safety and solidarity: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender asylum seekers and refugees in Scotland Cowen et al. (2011) deliver a substantial report which finds the asylum and refugee system for LGBT asylum seekers and refugees to be profoundly flawed. The report comprises a review of literature, interviews with organisations in Scotland and London and, community consultation. A notable feature emerging from the report was a distinct lack of data regarding both the numbers involved in and, the issues faced by LGBT asylum seekers and refugees. The report identifies key areas for further investigation, particularly in terms of identifying and promoting existing expertise and expanding knowledge and understanding within existing organisations. The report clearly documents the significant barriers faced by LGBT asylum seekers and refugees who arrive looking for sanctuary in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland, England Third sector
Gillespie (2012) Trapped: Destitution and asylum in Scotland This report draws attention to the risk of destitution faced by asylum seekers, who are at their most vulnerable if their asylum claim is refused. Gillespie (2012) explores the issue of destitution through interviews with some of those directly affected alongside survey data, supplemented by focus group and workshop input. The report questions the efficacy of the asylum system and decision-making processes (these are called into question on the basis of the success rate for appealed cases which is relatively high). The study underlines the fact that refusal of an asylum claim leaves many asylum seekers without the right to seek employment and without access to financial assistance, and thus without the mean to support themselves. The report provides an important assessment of the scale and nature of destitution experienced by those within the asylum system, it also provides an insightful account of the impact of destitution on asylum seekers in Scotland, and includes recommendations for moving forward. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker Scotland Third sector
Lewis (2006) Warm Welcome? Understanding public attitudes to asylum seekers in Scotland Lewis’s (2006) report for the Institute for Public Policy Research think tank examines Scottish attitudes towards asylum seekers and refugees. Moreover, Lewis attempts to uncover the beliefs and attitudes that underpin such opinions. A clear focus on asylum rather than wider immigration issues is maintained throughout. However, one of the key findings suggests that, for some people, these phenomena are inseparable. Young people in particular expressed more negative attitudes and conflated the two issues. The research was based on data from focus groups with a range of participants and input from key stakeholders. Regional responses were then matched to reported experiences of seeking asylum. The findings reported highlight a lack of accurate information in the public domain. Thus, it is argued that ensuring the Scottish public is better informed is essential for integration. When comparing attitudes with those found in England, however, Scotland generally exhibits a greater level of tolerance towards asylum seekers and the principle of asylum. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Third sector
MOVING ON? DISPERSAL POLICY, ONWARD MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION OF REFUGEES IN THE UK Since 2000, the UK has operated compulsory dispersal, a policy designed to ‘spread the burden’ of housing asylum seekers who require accommodation across the UK and to discourage long-term settlement in London and the South East. To enhance understanding of refugee integration, this research discusses the two-year (2012–14), ESRC-funded project, in which the geography of onward migration amongst refugees dispersed across the UK as asylum seekers was mapped. The findings are based on 83 in-depth interviews with refugees, analysis of Refugee Integration and Employment Service (RIES) client data (2008–11) and analysis of the Home Office Survey of New Refugees (SNR) data (2005–09) for four different sites across the UK: Glasgow, Cardiff, Manchester and London. The report explores the main factors that influence refugees’ decisions to stay in a town or city or move on and considered how this affects the process of integration. Finally, the report examines the policy implications for the different levels of government, service providers and the voluntary sector of the long-term impact of UK dispersal policy on refugee onward migration and integration. The report weaves together quantitative and qualitative data analysis findings to address key questions surrounding refugee onward migration and integration outcomes. Read More Visit site UK Research Report
RITeS (2008) Refugees Into Teaching in Scotland: Research report This report is the culmination of a two-year period of research conducted as part of the Refugees Into Teaching in Scotland Project (RITeS) which engaged with refugee teachers in the West of Scotland. Although the report recognises the distinction between refugees and asylum seekers, they are not differentiated for the purposes of the study. Instead, the term ‘refugee’ is used throughout the study. The report includes discussion of the demographic profile of refugee teachers and teachers’ experiences and their expectations. There follows an exploration of methodologies and curricula employed in refugee teachers’ countries of origin. This exploration allows the researchers to identify any specific training or support needs that this group of professional migrants may have. The report also provides guidelines on the facilitation of good practice to promote the integration of refugee and asylum seeking professionals in Scotland. Also see the study by Smyth and Kum (2010) which examines the issues faced by teachers who are either refugees or asylum seekers in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Third sector
Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) Recent Migration into Scotland: The Evidence Base This National Institute of Economic and Social Research publication authored by Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) reviews evidence from a wide range of sources (published and unpublished, qualitative and quantitative) to assess the impact of migration to Scotland since 2004. In addition to assessing the impact of A8 migrants, the report also considers the impact of the arrival of refugee and asylum seekers. The authors assess the impact of these immigration flows in economic, employment and social spheres. The report finds that the statistical data that is available is rather limited. In addition, the authors identify a number of gaps where information needs to be improved. Additional research is particularly needed in the domains of health, education, crime, children and social care. In order to effectively inform policy, more information is required on barriers to accessing employment, migrant access to services and the catalysts and barriers to community integration. The study reflects the fact that migration does increase demand for public services but it also acknowledges migration’s central role in the Scottish Government’s economic strategy. Read More Visit site Free A8, Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Scottish Government
Scottish Refugee Council (2013) Asylum in Scotland: The Facts This publication by the Scottish Refugee Council (2013) provides a factual guide to issues affecting asylum seekers and refugees in Scotland. The Scottish Refugee Council identified the need for such information to be made available. This report is a response to misinformation found in public opinion polls where asylum is often conflated with regular immigration. In addition, public attitudes towards immigration often confuse multiple issues such as race relations, globalisation and the European Union. Alongside clarifying definitions, this review provides a short informative summary which underlines the fact that asylum seekers are principally seeking safety when they enter the host country. The report also provides accurate statistical data on asylum numbers. It exposes some of the popular misconceptions surrounding asylum as well as showing the human face of asylum seekers and refugees by sharing some of their individual stories. In sum, Asylum in Scotland: The Facts provides an accessible factual guide to the asylum system and is a welcome contribution to informed debate on asylum in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Third sector
Snyder (2011) Un/settling Angels: Faith-based organizations and asylum-seeking in the UK Snyder (2011) investigates the rationale behind Church support for people seeking asylum in Scotland. The author also discusses the challenges and impediments such faith-based organisations face when attempting to provide such support. The study centres on three key aspects of religious organisations’ activities in relation to their work with asylum seekers. These are transcendent motivation, organisation and strategies and mobilisation of resources. The study reviews the aspects of support the Church provides to aid settlement. Pastoral care, worship and advocacy aimed to help new arrivals settle are discussed in addition to church-led efforts designed to question negative attitudes, raise awareness and influence Government policy. By exploring how churches work with people seeking asylum, the study contributes to the under-researched area of the role played by faith-based organisations in supporting new arrivals to the UK. The research demonstrates the strong contribution churches make to the provision of support for asylum seekers. The author proposes that more work needs to be done to explore non-Christian engagement in this area. Read More Visit site £ Asylum seeker, Refugee UK Journal article
Stewart (2005) Employment and integration of refugee doctors in Scotland This study is part of a wider body of work undertaken by the Global Commission on International Migration (GCIM) launched by the UN Secretary-General. This approach has been taken in recognition of the importance of migration to the international community. The resulting reports published as part of the Global Migration Perspectives collection are intended as a contribution to discourse on international migration. This report by Stewart (2005) examines the integration of refugees and asylum seekers from a Scottish perspective. The study examines the issue of integration using the employment of refugee doctors as a case study. The study reviews Glasgow’s position in the context of the UK’s asylum dispersal policy, highlighting the structural impediments that may impact on employment. The research also notes that integration is a process that draws unique individual and institutional factors together. This collaborative research project - conducted in Glasgow - exposes the challenges to integration which stem from UK legislative frameworks, most notably the policy of precluding asylum seekers from employment. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Independent research