Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
COSLA Strategic Migration Partnership (2011) Policy Toolkit The COSLA Strategic Migration Partnership (2011) Policy Toolkit was developed in response to a need to counter the demographic challenges faced by Scotland’s ageing population. The authors provide a toolkit which is aimed at facilitating a more targeted and strategic local authority response to migration. The toolkit is also intended to be sufficiently flexible to enable authorities to meet the specific needs of their area. While recognising the measures local authority and community partners have already implemented, the toolkit provides local government and community planning partners with further advice on how they can benefit from migration, provide guidance on welcoming migrants into their local authority area and, how to meet service and access requirements in order to encourage long term settlement. The toolkit encourages Community Planning Partnerships to optimise the structures they have in place for the implementation of a strategic approach to migration. This toolkit will be of use to local authorities or other organisations who are working towards integration of existing migrant groups as well as to those specifically developing strategies to attract new migrants to their area. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Public sector
Cowen et al. (2011) Sanctuary, safety and solidarity: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender asylum seekers and refugees in Scotland Cowen et al. (2011) deliver a substantial report which finds the asylum and refugee system for LGBT asylum seekers and refugees to be profoundly flawed. The report comprises a review of literature, interviews with organisations in Scotland and London and, community consultation. A notable feature emerging from the report was a distinct lack of data regarding both the numbers involved in and, the issues faced by LGBT asylum seekers and refugees. The report identifies key areas for further investigation, particularly in terms of identifying and promoting existing expertise and expanding knowledge and understanding within existing organisations. The report clearly documents the significant barriers faced by LGBT asylum seekers and refugees who arrive looking for sanctuary in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland, England Third sector
Crawford et al. (2012) Migration and health in Glasgow and its relevance to GoWell This report by Crawford et al. (2012) was produced for the collaborative partnership GoWell (See www.gowellonline.com). With a focus on health and Wellbeing;in Glasgow, the study provides a brief historical background, an examination of the impact of migration through areas such as policy, regeneration, legislation and analysis of migration patterns. It also provides interesting detail of ethnic composition and demographic changes within the boundaries of the GoWell study area. The report reviews findings from survey data which report that migrants declare themselves to be in better health than fellow residents within their local community area. The report helps contextualise the GoWell study findings and provides an insightful account of the impact of previous and current migration patterns, the influence of policy, and the effects of migration on health in Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Public sector
Danson and Jentsch (2009) The new Scottish rural labour market: processes of inclusion and exclusion Defining ‘rural’ as a settlement comprising a population of less than 3,000 people, Danson and Jentsch (2009) consider past debate surrounding the rural labour market. Previously, this market had been concerned with outward migration of Scotland’s youth in search of better employment opportunities. Danson and Jentsch update this understanding, providing a contemporary perspective that takes account of the dynamics of current inward migration to rural Scotland. Their analysis of the labour market and rural migration touches on the contrasting experiences of inclusion and exclusion. On one hand migrant workers are viewed as valued employees who help to sustain rural communities. On the other hand, they experience public negativity in terms of housing allocation and competition for employment. In essence, the authors contend that rather than developing policy centred on particular social groups, policy should be developed to address the issues that surround processes of labour market exclusion. See related studies such as Danson and Jentsch (2012); de Lima (2012); de Lima and Wright (2009). Read More Visit site £ Scotland Book
Danson and Jentsch (2012) International migration and economic participation in small towns and rural areas—cross-national evidence Danson and Jentsch (2012) include Scotland (case study of the Outer Hebrides) in their cross-national comparative study of international migration to rural areas (together with the USA, Canada and Ireland). This approach allows them to discuss key themes within a comparative context. The study focuses on migrant experiences related to underemployment, pay and working conditions along with the important influence of welcoming communities for migrant settlement experience. Although chiefly cross-national in scope, the study nonetheless shows that in Scotland’s case, communities are more receptive to migrants in areas which have previously experienced sustained out-migration. In both rural and urban areas migrant workers are viewed as integral to sustaining some businesses. In turn, this means that migrant workers enjoy high rates of employment – albeit physically demanding work characterised by long or unsociable hours and low pay. The study draws attention to a continuing feature within Scotland; poor matching of migrants’ skills and qualifications with appropriate levels of employment. See also Danson and Jentsch (2009) which examines processes of inclusion and exclusion within the rural Scottish labour market. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, USA, Canada, Ireland Journal article
de Lima (2010) Boundary crossings: Migration, belonging/‘un-belonging’ in rural Scotland With migration seen as a means of tackling rural population decline, de Lima (2010) challenges the perception of rural areas as being both devoid of migration and culturally homogenous. He contrasts this view with perceptions of municipal landscapes as cosmopolitan in outlook and the only locations where ethnic minorities can be found in Scotland. The study provides an intriguing account of identity and the sense of belonging held by international migrants to Scotland’s rural areas. The study is also an examination of the fluidity and plurality found within rural spaces, which also introduces the reader to the concept of ‘translocalism’. For additional studies on migrant labour in rural Scotland, also see de Lima and Wright (2009) who also explore both the role and the impact of migrant workers in rural communities, de Lima (2007) which finds migrants to be integral to the rural workforce and, Danson and Jentsch (2009) which focuses on processes on inclusion and exclusion. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
de Lima (2012) Migration, ‘race’ equality and discrimination: A question of social justice This paper by de Lima (2012) provides an overview of the background to migration discourse in Scotland. Chiefly, the paper considers the economic impact of Scotland’s ageing population. Setting the discussion within a post-devolution context, the author argues that migration policies should not be based solely on economic drivers, but that principles of social justice should also be taken into account. This must be done in order to address both discrimination towards minority groups and the host community worries about threatened livelihoods. See also Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) which highlights migration’s central place in the Scottish Government’s economic strategy and the Scottish Government (2013b) review on equality outcomes, which covers attitudes to racial discrimination. For a study on Scottish public attitudes towards migration see McCollum et al. (2014) and similarly Bromley et al. (2007).Lewis (2006) examines attitudes found in Scotland towards asylum seekers and refugees. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Book
de Lima and Wright (2009) Welcoming migrants? Migrant labour in rural Scotland This study underlines the distinct differences that set rural Scotland apart from the rest of the UK as far as policy-making is concerned. Rural Scotland comprises remote areas, including the highlands and islands, within a geographically diverse landscape. De Lima and Wright (2009) explore key questions about the function played by migrant workers within the region, and their impact within rural communities. The authors also explore the role public sector agencies play in addressing the needs of all – both migrant and non-migrant - within rural communities. The authors draw attention to the paradoxical character of sizable Central and Eastern European migration to Scotland’s rural areas. On the one hand this immigration has placed pressure on public services and posed challenges in terms of integration, but, on the other, it has also filled labour gaps, checked outward migration and provided the basis for the regeneration of rural areas. See also de Lima et al. (2007) and Danson and Jentsch (2009); and Danson and Jentsch (2012) for related studies. Read More Visit site £ EU Scotland Journal article
de Lima et al. (2007) A study of migrant workers in Grampian This study of migrant workers in Grampian by de Lima et al. (2007) finds that migrants are an integral part of the locally employed workforce within the hospitality, agricultural and food processing sectors. Migrants are seen as the primary solution to labour shortages within the region. The study looks at the impact migrant workers have on local services. It also examines migrant access to these services. In doing so, the study identifies areas for consideration by service providers. The presence of a language barrier is a key point that emerges from the research. The language barrier is problematic for both service providers and migrant workers alike. In addition, a noticeable pattern of over qualified migrants subjected to irregular and long working hours is also in evidence. See also de Lima (2010); and Danson and Jentsch (2009) for further study of migrant labour in rural Scotland and, de Lima and Wright (2009) who also explore the roles and the impact of migrant workers within rural communities. Read More Visit site Free Aberdeenshire, Moray, Aberdeen City Scottish Government document
de Lima et al. (2011) Community consultation on poverty and ethnicity in Scotland The study by de Lima et al. (2011) seeks better understanding of income disparity and associated levels of poverty across a number of ethnic groups. Low paid Chinese, Eastern European, white Scottish and Traveller ethnic groups are included in the study. Research is conducted in Fife and Highland regions and local stakeholders contribute to the data that is analysed. Interviews sought to examine the perceptions of meaning and causes of poverty, its impact and the strategies employed to manage and ultimately escape the poverty trap. The study provides a fascinating insight into first-hand accounts of different ethnic groups’ experiences of poverty in Scotland. The subsequent discussion of policy implications is also valuable. See Barnard and Turner (2011) which examines evidence on the relationship between poverty and ethnicity across a number of domains, likewise Netto et al. (2011) and Hudson et al. (2013) which examines the link between ethnicity and poverty experienced by low paid workers. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Fife Third sector

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