Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
A guide for refugee parents about schools and learning in Scotland Answers to frequently asked questions about school education in Scotland. Useful websites for refugee parents in Scotland. Read More Visit site Scotland Education Scotland document
Aberdeen City Council (2013) Migrant workers in Aberdeen City and Shire This document produced by Aberdeen City Council is designed to provide up to date information primarily for local council services and Community Planning partners to assist with policy development and service delivery. The document includes indicatory data on inward migration flows of migrant workers to the area, and incorporates data such as country of origin and comparative data on registrations compared with elsewhere in Scotland. In addition, the document also includes the locations of migrant workers within Aberdeen, and draws upon information gathered from National Insurance Number allocations to overseas nationals via the Department of Work and Pensions and the annual Pupils in Scotland Census – which details pupils whose main home language is not English. The analysis shows Aberdeen to be the third highest area for numbers of registered migrant workers behind only Edinburgh and Glasgow, with Aberdeenshire found to be the sixth highest. Read More Visit site Free Aberdeenshire, Aberdeen City Public sector
Aspinall and Watters (2010) Refugees and asylum seekers: A review from an equality and human rights perspective Aspinall and Watters (2010) provide a comprehensive account of issues faced by refugees and asylum seekers within a number of domains including health, education and employment. The report is particularly relevant within a Scottish context as it outlines the situation found in Scotland as part of a section devoted to geographical differences within the UK. Following a brief outline of Scotland’s response to asylum seekers over past decades through the asylum dispersal programme of the UK Government and Glasgow’s principal participation, the authors provide detail of issues concerning housing; destitution; healthcare; integration of asylum seekers and refugees; children and young people; media and public attitudes, before finally touching on some of the differences found between Scottish and UK government policy. See also Ager and Strang (2010) for a study which focuses on refugee integration; Mulvey (2013); and Threadgold and Court (2005). Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Public sector
Aspinwall (2013) The Catholic Minority Experience in Scotland: the Poorhouse View, 1850–1914 For an insight into past experience of integration into Scottish life, this paper by Aspinwall provides an insightful account of how the mass identity of Scotland’s Catholics aligned with the Roman Catholic church, as a group only advanced within Scottish society following political, social and educational changes. Such changes, most notably in voting rights, education, and the emergence of the Labour Party, coincided with a demise in church hierarchy. Until this time, the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland had galvanised a poorly educated and low skilled flock into a coherent community in the midst of poverty and deprivation. This had been achieved through building social bonds and morality by way of a conservative brand of religion, set against a backdrop of prejudice. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
Bailey et al. (1994) The Chinese community in Scotland Although conducted over two decades ago, Bailey et al (1994) provide analysis of Scotland’s Chinese community, focusing on their economic and employment characteristics; housing and household structure; and analysis of urban settlement patterns. Drawing upon the 1991 Scottish census data, the authors also provide a brief but interesting historical background to Chinese migration to the UK and later arrival to Scotland. There is also a discussion of the debate over whether or not the Chinese can be said to constitute a community. Based upon the study’s findings, the authors reflect upon policy considerations which could best meet the needs of Scotland’s Chinese population in a culturally sensitive manner. The study was – and still is - viewed very much as a starting point in terms of researching this community. It highlights the presence in Scotland of a significantly under researched and distinct ethnic minority. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Bailey et al. (1995) Pakistanis in Scotland: Census data and research issues Bailey et al (1995) highlight the significant place of the Pakistani community in Scotland as a distinct population group, particularly in terms of demographics, housing and career/occupation compared to Scotland’s wider population. Drawing upon 1991 Census data, the study examines the household composition and economic position of Scotland’s Pakistanis in addition to shedding light on their pattern of settlement across Scotland. The authors find distinct patterns emerge from the data which suggest a notable contrast with those of the general Scottish population. Although dating from 1995, the authors’ inclusion of a historical background the study provides a useful insight into one of Scotland’s important ethnic minority communities. For more on Scotland’s Pakistani community, see an earlier study by Bowes et al. (1990a) and a subsequent study by Saeed et al. (1999) which focuses on issues of identity among Glasgow’s Pakistani teenagers. Read More Visit site £ TCN Scotland Journal article
Beadle and Silverman (2007) Examining the impact of EU enlargement and the introduction of the UK citizenship test on provision of English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in Scotland Beadle and Silverman (2007) provide a comprehensive study of English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in terms of both providers and learners in Scotland. The main strength of the study is the incorporation of both ESOL provider and learner perspectives, which highlights the central place of ESOL in aiding migrant integration into Scottish society. Although the study includes consideration of private provision and provision within higher education institutions, it primarily focuses on publicly funded ESOL provision, across a range of providers including colleges, the community and voluntary sectors. Beadle and Silverman (2007) not only draw attention to an increased demand for ESOL and subsequent need for further provision, but also to an increasing need for courses within Scotland’s rural areas due to recent A8 migration. In the concluding chapter, the authors reflect upon the policy implications stemming from their findings. Read More Visit site Free EU Scotland Scottish Government document
Bowes and Domokos (1993) South Asian women and health services: A study in Glasgow Bowes and Domokos (1993) examined the healthcare experience of a selection of Glasgow’s South Asian women (mostly of Punjabi origin). They investigate the women’s own experiences through interviews. The authors also discuss the experiences of the women’s families. A number of issues emerged, such as a necessity for greater translation assistance and a need to challenge discrimination and stereotyping within health service delivery; the study stresses the importance of accessing the unheard voices of this minority group by focusing centrally on their concerns over healthcare. Although the study focused on a specific ethnic minority group and dates from the 1990s, it suggests additional areas for further research and its key finding is significant: rather than cultural barriers it is the healthcare system and occurrence of racism which inhibit full access to healthcare services for South Asian women in Glasgow. Read More Visit site £ TCN Glasgow City Journal article
Bowes et al. (1990a) The changing nature of Glasgow's ethnic‐minority community Bowes et al (1990a) chart the changes exhibited by ethnic minority groups in Glasgow (mainly within the context of council housing). The discussion is based on data gathered as part of an earlier local authority funded study. The paper incorporated data from the electoral register, which although limited in some respects, was nonetheless the best data available on household composition. The data are complemented by a household survey undertaken by the authors. The analysis shows the average ethnic minority household size as notably greater than the overall Glasgow average. In addition, the paper discusses ethnic minority employment patterns, the first and second languages spoken within households, and mobility. Although the study pre-dates the diversity seen today in Glasgow, it nonetheless provides an interesting snapshot of a period of change amongst Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article
Bowes et al. (1990b) Racism and harassment of Asians in Glasgow Although a study of racism during the late nineteen eighties, Bowes et al (1990b) combine case-study methodology and survey data to provide analysis of both institutional and interpersonal racism as experienced by the Asian community in Glasgow and considers those experiences within a wider Scottish context. With a focus on the policies of the Housing Department of the then Glasgow District Council, the paper begins with a interesting discussion of the use of central terms, which allows the authors to present an explanation for their use of the term ‘racial harassment’ in preference to that of ‘racist harassment’. Overall, the study found a general lack of enforcement rendered anti-racist measures ineffective when it came to addressing institutional racism. See also Bowes et al (1990a) for a study dating from the same period which also considered issues faced by Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities in relation to council housing. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article

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